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lazy

Pronunciation: /ˈleɪzi/

Translation of lazy in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo (lazier, laziest)

  • [person/day/stroll] perezoso, holgazán, flojo [colloquial/familiar] I'm in a lazy mood ando sin ganas de hacer nada, tengo una flojera [colloquial/familiar] we spent a lazy weekend on the beach pasamos un fin de semana en la playa sin hacer nada to have a lazy eye [Medicine/Medicina] tener* un ojo perezoso
    Example sentences
    • But my experience with talented people is that many are lazy and unwilling to work hard to nourish their talent.
    • I am a marketer's dream, with my lazy, paranoia-based brand loyalty.
    • Yet for some odd reason parent's seem to prefer that their kids be thought of as lazy rather than ignorant.
    Example sentences
    • Research has found that long, lazy summer holidays could be putting children's literacy skills at risk.
    • The languid, back-and-forth rhythm of a swaying swing slows time on a lazy summer day.
    • Every song on this disc is slow and lazy in that Jamaican summer vibe.

Definition of lazy in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's literary renaissance, known as the Golden Age (Siglo de Oro/i>), roughly covers the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It includes the Italian-influenced poetry of figures such as Garcilaso de la Vega; the religious verse of Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Ávila and San Juan de la Cruz; picaresque novels such as the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes and Quevedo's Buscón; Miguel de Cervantes' immortal Don Quijote; the theater of Lope de Vega, and the ornate poetry of Luis de Góngora.