There are 2 translations of lead in Spanish:

lead1

n

  • 1 /led/ 1.1 u (metal) plomo (m) don't move or I'll fill you full of lead! ¡quieto o te acribillo a balazos or te lleno el cuerpo de plomo! as heavy as lead my feet felt as heavy as lead los pies me pesaban como (un) plomo to get the lead out (of one's pants) (AmE) [colloquial/familiar] ponerse* a trabajar duro (before n) lead crystal cristal (m) (que contiene óxido de plomo y es muy preciado) lead paint pintura (f) con plomo lead pipe tubería (f) or cañería de plomo lead poisoning intoxicación (f) por plomo (chronic disease) saturnismo (m) lead soldier soldadito (m) de plomo 1.2 c [Naut] sonda (f), escandallo (m) to swing the lead (BrE) poner* excusas para no trabajar c u (for fishing) plomo (m)
    More example sentences
    • Winter ice pack consists of a diverse mix of ice of different thicknesses and floe sizes, and of open water in leads.
    • They finally got the break they needed when they found a way over the open water lead after a 15-hour slog through the blizzard.
    • The drift-ice fields were forced together with such speed, that Johnsen supposed that in a couple of hours the whole lead would be completely closed.
    More example sentences
    • A man leaped into the chains, and lowering down the lead sounded in seven fathoms.
    • Deep soundings above 6 fathoms (11 m) were impracticable so the practice then was to sound the depth using a line and lead.
    • You'll feel weed fall against the line and the lead get picked up by the swell.
    1.3 c u (in pencil) mina (f) to put lead in sb's pencil [slang/argot] ser* un afrodisíaco (before n) lead pencil lápiz (m) (de mina)
    More example sentences
    • The transfer was made by first rubbing the back of their sketch with pencil lead.
    • Then I rubbed my lips, my beard, and my hands with pencil lead, and went to bed.
    • The sliding motion of those sheets over each other gives pencil lead its properties.
    1.4
    (leads pl)
    (in window, for roof) emplomado (m)
    More example sentences
    • The ladder was over-short, and it required an effort to heave oneself from it through the casement on to the leads.
    • The church was restored by the late Godfrey Allen, who renewed the leads of the roof.
  • 2 /liːd/ 2.1 (in competition) (no pl) to be in/hold the lead ir*/seguir* a la cabeza or en cabeza, llevar/conservar la delantera to move into the lead, to take the lead ponerse* a la cabeza or en cabeza, tomar la delantera Acme has taken the lead from Chipco in the car market Acme ha pasado a ocupar el primer lugar, desplazando a Chipco, en el mercado del automóvil she has a lead of 20 meters/points over her nearest rival le lleva 20 metros/puntos de ventaja a su rival más cercano 2.2 (example, leadership) (no pl) ejemplo (m) to give a lead dar* (el) ejemplo to follow o take sb's lead seguir* el ejemplo de algn you should take their lead and resign debería seguir su ejemplo y dimitir if you don't know what to do, just follow my lead si no sabe qué hacer, haga lo mismo que yo they took the lead in expelling foreign companies tomaron la iniciativa en expulsar a las compañías extranjeras
    More example sentences
    • Well done to Wandsworth Council for taking the lead in this initiative.
    • I am going to follow the lead of a number of other bloggers and take a break now (another one, I know).
    • He said there was no intention to follow the lead of some other professional firms by quitting Bradford in favour of Leeds.
    2.3 c (clue) pista (f) to investigate/follow up a lead investigar*/seguir* una pista
    More example sentences
    • She said there have been no leads or clues to their whereabouts.
    • Officers are looking for new leads and clues as they hunt the sex fiend who assaulted a 17-year-old girl at knifepoint on February 25.
    • Detectives searching for a missing Hull woman are following new leads which suggest she may have headed off to see her boyfriend after all.
    2.4 c (for dog) (BrE) correa (f), traílla (f) put the dog on its lead ponle la correa or la traílla al perro dogs must be kept on a lead at all times prohibido dejar a los perros sueltos [Elec] cable (m)
    More example sentences
    • There was a large metal case, with various wires, leads, and tubes connected.
    • Carry out a safety check: tidy trailing electrical leads, plug electricity points for young children and make sure your smoke detectors work.
    • He starts dragging out wires and leads, trying to fix the patching.
    More example sentences
    • One of the suspects let the animal off its lead and it ran after the victim.
    • Her comments have been backed by Bolton council chiefs, who are now advising people to keep their animals on leads.
    • The prisoners were lifted to their feet, had their ankle bindings cut and ropes tied loosely round their necks like animal leads.
    2.5 c (main role) papel (m) principal the male/female lead (role) el papel principal masculino/femenino (person) el primer actor/la primera actriz to play the lead hacer* el papel principal, ser* el/la protagonista [Mus] (no pl) solista (mf) to sing/play (the) lead ser* la voz/el músico solista (before n) [guitar/singer] principal
    More example sentences
    • Contemporary music is played by an orchestra that mainly uses European instruments with a lead singer and chorus.
    • These three make up the band's trio of lead vocalists and songwriters.
    • Four hours before the band was supposed to perform, the lead singer and guitarist was still in New York.
    More example sentences
    • Considering this is her first lead role in a feature film, she is very impressive.
    • Unless it's an outright silent film, you are never going to see a film in which the lead characters have less dialogue than this one.
    • In the 1950s, the actor Montgomery Clift turned down the lead parts in four films.
    2.6 c [Journ] also lead story artículo (m) principal (opening paragraph) (AmE) introducción (f) (de un artículo de prensa); (before n) [paragraph] inicial
    More example sentences
    • Again, all the prime minister had to do was call for calm and he was part of the lead news story.
    • Both local newspapers published lead editorials calling for the privatization of the system.
    • When a story like this is promoted to the lead item on national news bulletins, you know that all perspective has gone out of the window.
    2.7 (cards) (no pl) it was her lead salía ella, ella era mano her lead was the three of hearts salió con el tres de corazones
    More example sentences
    • If it was not the last trick, the lead for the next trick passes to the left.
    • The queen may take a trick with more points later or win the lead at a crucial moment.
    • The player on the dealer's right has the first lead, and the winner of the trick leads to the next trick.
    More example sentences
    • He missed a series of chances, before and after United took the lead.
    • The following week, she took the lead in the overall World Cup.
    • Brazil, meanwhile, looked poor on the whole but created five great chances and are unlucky not to be in the lead.

Definition of lead in:

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Word of the day merienda
f
afternoon snack …
Cultural fact of the day

Each of the 55 different administrative areas into which Spain is divided is called a provincia. Each provincia includes a main city or town, sometimes more, depending on its social and economic power. The provincial capital usually has the same name as the province. Most comunidades autónomas comunidad autónoma comprise at least two or more

There are 2 translations of lead in Spanish:

lead2

/liːd/ vt (past & past p led)

  • 1 1.1 (guide, conduct) [person/animal] llevar, guiar* he led her across the field la guió or condujo a través del campo he led his troops into battle inició el ataque al frente de sus tropas he led her onto the dance floor la llevó hasta la pista to lead sb to sth/sb conducir* or llevar a algn a algo/ante algn she led the party to victory condujo el partido a la victoria the path led them to a clearing el sendero los condujo or los llevó a un claro they were led to safety by firemen los bomberos los pusieron a salvo lead us to your master! ¡condúcenos ante tu amo! to lead sb aside/to one side llevar a algn aparte/a un lado to lead sb away/off llevarse a algn he was led away by police se lo llevó la policía lead the way! ¡ve tú delante or (esp AmL) adelante!
    More example sentences
    • She pulled the horse to a halt, and led him by the rope.
    • He led her with a rope tied around her hands.
    • You can also attach a lead rope to him and lead him around with you as you clean.
    1.2 (to a particular state, course of action) to lead sb into temptation hacer* caer a algn en la tentaciónto lead sb to sth/+ inf this led me to the conclusion that … esto me hizo llegar a la conclusión de que … you led me to this! ¡tú me metiste en esto! whatever led you to resign? ¿qué te llevó a dimitir? I was led to believe that … me dieron a entender que … 1.3 (influence, induce) [witness] insinuarle* la respuesta a he's easily led se deja llevar fácilmente
    More example sentences
    • In the rest of this article, we discuss the ideas and reasoning that led us to our final decision.
    • Omar's reflections on his wife's motives lead him to contemplate his own life.
    • When did the idea for the game first arise, and what were the key reasons that led you to decide to go ahead and develop it?
  • 2 (head, have charge of) [discussion] conducir* [orchestra] (conduct) (AmE) dirigir*; (play first violin in) (BrE) ser* el primer violín de the expedition was led by a famous anthropologist la expedición iba al mando de un famoso antropólogo she leads a star-studded cast encabeza un elenco estelar he led the congregation in prayer oró junto a los fieles the chairman led the applause el presidente inició los aplausos
    More example sentences
    • He led them to the front gate and used the keycard to open the door.
    • Brady walked in front of them and led them towards the cabin.
    • She led them to the front desk, where an old man with graying hair sat reading an old newspaper.
    More example sentences
    • Relieved of command, he led IX Corps for much of the rest of the war.
    • Firm in our resolve, focused on our mission, and led by a superb commander in chief, we will prevail.
    • He led an official Chinese delegation, which visited the northern Black Sea resorts over the weekend.
    More example sentences
    • The session was organised and led by the Community Librarian for Warminster.
    • On Saturday morning there was a meditation followed by a session on healing led by a psychotherapist.
    • She had led a £100m management buyout just one year previously.
    More example sentences
    • The musicians were members of the Scottish Symphony Orchestra, led by violinist Robert McFall.
    • Hutchinson, a singer and musician who once led the Straight Ahead Jazz ensemble, does vocals on the disc.
    • The group has a wide repertoire and is led by Carol Green, a music teacher, choir trainer and flautist.
  • 3 3.1 (be at front of) [parade/attack] encabezar*, ir* al frente de his mother led the mourners su madre encabezaba el cortejo fúnebre 3.2 (in race, competition) [opponent] aventajar they led the opposing team by ten points aventajaban al equipo contrario por diez puntos, le llevaban diez puntos de ventaja al equipo contrario to lead the field [Sport] ir* en cabeza or a la cabeza, llevar la delantera she led the rest of the class by a long way aventajaba con mucho al resto de la clase, iba muy por delante del resto de la clase they lead the world in this kind of technology son los líderes mundiales en este tipo de tecnología
    More example sentences
    • Stewart had the dominant car through most of the race, leading for 283 laps.
    • By lap 35 he was leading but the race was far from being over.
    • He led for the entire race and was only caught in the last couple of strides.
    More example sentences
    • In pioneering a new sort of scholarly publication the National Trust could lead the world.
    • All these considerations indicate clearly why countries like the USA and Japan lead the world in the innovation and exporting of high-technology products.
    • Swimming became a popular national exercise in which, for many decades, Britain led the world.
  • 4 [life] llevar to lead a quiet/very active life llevar or tener* una vida tranquila/muy activa to lead a normal life llevar or hacer* una vida normal
    More example sentences
    • My aim is to lead a completely nonviolent life, in which I harm nothing.
    • Tyler would lead a completely different life from his parents.
    • I'll be the first to admit that I've led a somewhat sheltered life since arriving in Bulgaria last January.
  • 5 (play) [trumps/hearts] salir* con
    More example sentences
    • These games also have strong restrictions on the cards that can be led or played to a trick.
    • The person to the dealer's left leads a card, and everyone else plays a card, clockwise.
    • In fact it is a normal tactic to lead lower spades to try to drive out the queen.

/liːd/ vi (past & past p led)

  • 1to lead to sth [road/path/steps] llevar or conducir* or dar* a algo [door] dar* a algo the alley led to a little courtyard el callejón llevaba or conducía a un pequeño patio this discussion isn't leading anywhere esta discusión no conduce a nada six streets lead off the square de la plaza salen seis calles
    More example sentences
    • Two sets of double doors lead to a spacious conservatory from where double doors lead out to the lawned back garden.
    • ‘The routes leading into Leeds from this part of the city are already seriously overcrowded,’ he added.
    • A gate has been padlocked on an access road leading down to one beach to prevent vehicles getting too close.
  • 2 2.1 (be, act as leader) you lead, we'll follow ve delante or (esp AmL) adelante, que te seguimos the man leads in ballroom dancing en los bailes de salón es el hombre quien lleva a su pareja 2.2 (in race, competition) [competitor] ir* a la cabeza, puntear (AmL) they are leading by three goals van ganando por tres goles the Republicans are leading in the polls los republicanos van a la cabeza en or encabezan las encuestas
  • 3 3.1 [Journ] 'The Times' leads with the budget deficit 'The Times' dedica su artículo de fondo al déficit presupuestario 3.2 (in cards) salir*, ser* mano to lead with three aces salir* con tres ases North to lead (in bridge) el norte es mano 3.3 (in boxing) atacar* he led with his right atacó con la derecha
    More example sentences
    • He charged the man on the left, leading with his right fist and smashing it into the man's jaw dropping him to the floor.
    • In the middle rounds, Calderon also began to mix a right hook into his offensive game plan, both punctuating combinations and leading with this rediscovered weapon.
    • He led with a wild flurry of punches, but they were blocked effortlessly.
    More example sentences
    • My parents may watch a lot of television, but they don't care for the local news leading off with murders.
    • Two weeks ago, Stewart led off with a news story from CNN.
    • For a change, we decided this week to lead off with Good News.

Phrasal verbs

lead in with

v + adv + prep + o
comenzar* or empezar* con

lead off

v + adv + prep + o to lead off with sth empezar* or comenzar* con algo 1.1v + adv + o empezar*, comenzar* the minister led off the session with … el ministro abrió la sesión con … see also lead2 2 1

lead on

v + adv lead on! ¡adelante! (¡te seguimos!) 1.1v + o + adv (raise false hopes) engañar they were led on with promises of high wages los engañaron or los engatusaron con promesas de sueldos altos she's been leading him on for years hace años que lo tiene agarrado de las narices dándole esperanzas [familiar/colloquial]

lead to

v + prep + o
(result in) llevar or conducir* a such irresponsibility can only lead to disaster semejante irresponsabilidad solo puede conducir al desastre one thing led to another and … una cosa llevó a la otra y …, de una cosa se pasó a la otra y …

lead up to

v + adv + prep + o
1.1 (precede) preceder a the events leading up to the crisis los acontecimientos que precedieron a la crisis 1.2 (prepare) he was obviously leading up to something era obvio que estaba preparando el terreno para algo, era obvio que algo se proponía what's all this leading up to? ¿qué te propones ( or se proponen etc) con todo esto?

Definition of lead in:

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Word of the day merienda
f
afternoon snack …
Cultural fact of the day

Each of the 55 different administrative areas into which Spain is divided is called a provincia. Each provincia includes a main city or town, sometimes more, depending on its social and economic power. The provincial capital usually has the same name as the province. Most comunidades autónomas comunidad autónoma comprise at least two or more