Translation of liaison in Spanish:

liaison

Pronunciation: /liˈeɪzɑːn; liˈeɪzn; -zɒn/

noun/nombre

  • 1 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (coordination) enlace (masculine), contacto (masculine), coordinación (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • Management of toxicities in the community requires close liaison with the hospital team, and severe toxicity requires immediate admission.
    • He said the Institute was putting in place a framework for the resolution of the problem and towards this end, it would work in close liaison with the residents, students, community leaders and the Gardai.
    • On the contrary, ‘lobbying’ must be applied vigorously in close liaison with constituent social movements.
    1.2 countable/numerable (person, official) enlace (masculine), contacto (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • If you want to interview someone in particular, see if a media liaison can arrange it for you.
    • This eight-week program trains parents to be active participants and advocates in their children's education and to share these skills as community liaisons.
    • Advisers serve advisees as advocates, guides, group leaders, community builders, liaisons with parents, and evaluation coordinators.
  • 2 countable/numerable (affair) [literary/literario] affaire (masculine), relación (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • In desperation, she entered warily into a sexual liaison with an army captain, who offered some promise of economic stability.
    • In 1613, she was accused of having a sexual liaison with a neighbour and to clear her name, went to the Church Court.
    • Above and below, divisions blur and the long-established equilibrium is knocked off balance amid revelations of illicit sexual liaisons and dubious business dealings.

Definition of liaison in:

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Cultural fact of the day

The National Police (Policía Nacional) was set up in Spain in 1976. Its members patrol provincial capitals and big cities, which are responsible for its finance, administration, and recruitment. Although armed, it has never been considered a repressive force, unlike the Guardia Civil.