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liaison

Pronunciation: /liˈeɪzɑːn; liˈeɪzn; -zɒn/

Translation of liaison in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (coordination) enlace (masculine), contacto (masculine), coordinación (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • Management of toxicities in the community requires close liaison with the hospital team, and severe toxicity requires immediate admission.
    • He said the Institute was putting in place a framework for the resolution of the problem and towards this end, it would work in close liaison with the residents, students, community leaders and the Gardai.
    • On the contrary, ‘lobbying’ must be applied vigorously in close liaison with constituent social movements.
    1.2 countable/numerable (person, official) enlace (masculine), contacto (masculine)
    Example sentences
    • If you want to interview someone in particular, see if a media liaison can arrange it for you.
    • This eight-week program trains parents to be active participants and advocates in their children's education and to share these skills as community liaisons.
    • Advisers serve advisees as advocates, guides, group leaders, community builders, liaisons with parents, and evaluation coordinators.
  • 2 countable/numerable (affair) [literary/literario] affaire (masculine), relación (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • In desperation, she entered warily into a sexual liaison with an army captain, who offered some promise of economic stability.
    • In 1613, she was accused of having a sexual liaison with a neighbour and to clear her name, went to the Church Court.
    • Above and below, divisions blur and the long-established equilibrium is knocked off balance amid revelations of illicit sexual liaisons and dubious business dealings.

Definition of liaison in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.