Translation of liberate in Spanish:

liberate

Pronunciation: /ˈlɪbəreɪt/

vt

  • 1 1.1 (set free) [formal] [prisoner/hostage] poner* or dejar en libertad, liberar
    More example sentences
    • From what were they supposed to be liberating us?
    • When the American soldiers liberated him, Tom began a two-year stint in various hospitals, battling for his life.
    • She was liberated in 1945 and trekked back to Poland, still cold and starving but with a one-way ticket to Warsaw.
    1.2 [people/nation] liberar, libertar; [woman] liberar
    More example sentences
    • Well, I mean, the press was led in right behind the troops who were liberating those places.
    • Assuming the role of Joan, you go about killing hordes of enemies in order to liberate France.
    • They fought on foreign shores, flew through enemy skies and risked their lives to liberate the world.
    More example sentences
    • The whole point of the experience was to be liberated from social conventions, not to create new ones.
    • The image is of the passive Asian woman subject to oppressive practices within the Asian family with an emphasis on wanting to ‘help’ Asian women liberate themselves from their role.
    • Celebrating the nerd liberates so many young people.
  • 2 [Chemistry/Química] liberar
    More example sentences
    • The compound lithium hydride, LiH, is a polar covalent solid that reacts with water to liberate hydrogen gas and form basic solutions of the metal hydroxide.
    • If that methane were suddenly liberated from its enclosing clathrate prison the impact on the carbon isotope record would be immediate and severe.
    • Consider what would happen if part of the energy liberated during the reaction went into vaporizing the water.

vi

  • liberar a liberating experience una experiencia liberadora

Definition of liberate in:

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Cultural fact of the day

The Basque autonomous police force is called Ertzaintza. Its members, called ertzainas, wear a uniform of red sweaters and berets, and white jackets. Despite the Ertzaintza's wide range of responsibilities, the Guardia Civil and Policía Nacional still operate in the Basque Country.