Translation of licorice in Spanish:

licorice

Pronunciation: /ˈlɪkərɪʃ; ˈlɪkərɪs/
, (British English/inglés británico) liquorice

noun/nombre

uncountable/no numerable
  • 1.1 (sweets) caramelos (masculine plural) de regaliz or orozuz
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    • Nearly eight years after Victory in Europe, the limit on jelly babies, pastilles, liquorice, barley sugar sticks, lemonade powder and chocolate bars was finally lifted - and a nation of schoolchildren cheered.
    • If the ritual centers around the oral fixation, and not the tobacco or the smoke itself, you could substitute a lollipop, licorice or hard sour candy for the cigarette.
    • Erin also made it a point to treat her sweet tooth every day with a small piece of chocolate, hard candy or licorice.
    1.2 (plant) regaliz (feminine), orozuz (masculine)
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    • Herbal treatments may include garlic, eucalyptus, licorice, lobelia, marshmallow, red clover and saw palmetto.
    • Containing dandelion, burdock, sarsparilla, milk thistle, liquorice, yellow dock, turmeric and red clover, a bottle provides about 30 servings as you dilute it with either still or sparkling water.
    • New herbs introduced to the already comprehensive range for this year include lemon basil, pineapple sage, aniseed basil, liquorice and comfrey.

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Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.