Translation of licorice in Spanish:

licorice

Pronunciation: /ˈlɪkərɪʃ; ˈlɪkərɪs/
, (British English/inglés británico) liquorice

noun/nombre

uncountable/no numerable
  • 1.1 (sweets) caramelos (masculine plural) de regaliz or orozuz
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    • Nearly eight years after Victory in Europe, the limit on jelly babies, pastilles, liquorice, barley sugar sticks, lemonade powder and chocolate bars was finally lifted - and a nation of schoolchildren cheered.
    • If the ritual centers around the oral fixation, and not the tobacco or the smoke itself, you could substitute a lollipop, licorice or hard sour candy for the cigarette.
    • Erin also made it a point to treat her sweet tooth every day with a small piece of chocolate, hard candy or licorice.
    1.2 (plant) regaliz (feminine), orozuz (masculine)
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    • Herbal treatments may include garlic, eucalyptus, licorice, lobelia, marshmallow, red clover and saw palmetto.
    • Containing dandelion, burdock, sarsparilla, milk thistle, liquorice, yellow dock, turmeric and red clover, a bottle provides about 30 servings as you dilute it with either still or sparkling water.
    • New herbs introduced to the already comprehensive range for this year include lemon basil, pineapple sage, aniseed basil, liquorice and comfrey.

Definition of licorice in:

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Word of the day bártulos
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Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, pinchos are small portions of food, often on a cocktail stick, eaten in a bar or cafe. Often free, they are similar to tapas, but much smaller. There are pinchos of many foods, including Spanish omelet, ham, sausage, and anchovy.