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liquidity

Pronunciation: /lɪˈkwɪdəti/

Translation of liquidity in Spanish:

noun/nombre

uncountable/no numerable
  • [Finance] [Law/Derecho] liquidez (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • ‘We have notions of linkages between liquidity and the bond markets, and between liquidity and different assets,’ says Diamond.
    • Irish businesses are facing the most serious liquidity squeeze in years.
    • This created a situation of low liquidity in the market and, according to him, it is easier to influence the market in times of low volume.
    Example sentences
    • Having ample cash is great for liquidity, but money sitting around as cash is not working for you and thus is not very advantageous.
    • Purchasing securities from a primary dealer and paying for them with cash adds liquidity to the banking system.
    • Potentially, an economy can stagnate until the crisis eases by sufficient liquidity coming back into general circulation.
    Example sentences
    • The bank is more concerned with liquidity than profitability, so that its central bank clients can withdraw funds without publicity at a moment's notice.
    • Allowing them access to the exchange using authorised brokers would increase transparency and boost liquidity, Shen said.
    • The territory's top securities regulator said liquidity, transaction costs and managerial skills in Hong Kong remained among the best in Asia.

Definition of liquidity in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.