Translation of literature in Spanish:

literature

Pronunciation: /ˈlɪtərətʃʊr; ˈlɪtrətʃə(r)/

n

u
  • 1.1 (art) literatura (f)
    More example sentences
    • These deaths are real deaths, and they pile up in ways that define our histories and literatures and social sciences.
    • The seminar's topic was Renaissance utopian literatures, focusing on More's Utopia.
    • Many scholars consider this novel a modern classic in US literatures.
    1.2 (published works) bibliografía (f), material (m) publicado
    More example sentences
    • There is almost no published literature on the subject, and we are largely guided by our own opinions, experience, and - in some cases - prejudice.
    • And contrary to some assertions, they have published peer-reviewed literature on the subject.
    • It is certainly true that the published literature on the subject is well surveyed.
    1.3 (promotional material) folletos (mpl), información (f)
    More example sentences
    • For more straightforward cash rewards, consumers will have to read the small print of product literature to ensure they have the card that best suits their spending needs.
    • They will be visiting problem areas to hand out literature and advice to people on how best to secure their vehicles, and offering support to victims.
    • The campaign included rebranding the company and producing new corporate literature, advertising and media, website and promotional items.

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