Translation of lively in Spanish:

lively

Pronunciation: /ˈlaɪvli/

adjective/adjetivo (-lier, -liest)

  • [place/atmosphere/debate] animado; [music] alegre; [car/engine] con brío; [description/account] vívido he's a lively character es un tipo de lo más animado y alegre they have three lively children tienen tres niños traviesos y llenos de vida lively minds read the Daily Globe la gente con inquietudes lee el Daily Globe they take a lively interest in developments toman un vivo interés en el desarrollo de los asuntos things are getting a bit lively around here las cosas se están poniendo un poco movidas por aquí [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • He was so lively and full of energy that it dawned on us that he must have been in some sort of pain for a lot longer than we had thought.
    • Although a lively and outgoing teenager, he lives with the effects of what his father, Greg, termed ‘subtle neurological damage’.
    • Nine-year-old Ricky is described as a lively, active boy who loves reading, swimming, watching TV and playing computer games.
    More example sentences
    • When the fast is broken, there are festive activities in a lively atmosphere.
    • The karaoke bar maintained a lively atmosphere, even at such a late hour.
    • The town was a lively place, buzzing with activity.
    More example sentences
    • A bonus is the Reading Group Companion Section at the end of the novel, featuring 10 questions sure to stimulate a lively discussion of the book.
    • Thank you both very much for a spirited, lively, intelligent discussion.
    • However, it would be a foolish man who tried to dictate to three such lively and intelligent minds.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.