There are 2 translations of living in Spanish:

living1

Pronunciation: /ˈlɪvɪŋ/

n

  • 1 (livelihood) (no pl) to earn o make one's/a living ganarse la vida it's hard to make a living from music es difícil vivir de la música or ganarse la vida como músico they scrape o scratch a living selling trinkets sobreviven or malviven vendiendo chucherías what do you do for a living? ¿en qué trabajas?, ¿a qué te dedicas? she's never had to work for her o a living nunca ha tenido que trabajar para vivir the world doesn't owe you a living no tienes derecho a vivir sin trabajar (before n) living expenses gastos (mpl) de manutención y alojamiento
    More example sentences
    • The yield may not be large but farmers manage to feed their family and make a living.
    • But as I said, I'm aware of the problems earning enough money to make a living.
    • Many of the ballet artistes continue performing because it is too late for them to look to any other profession to make a living.
  • 2 u (style of life) vida (f) clean/loose living vida ordenada/disipada or disoluta too much good living had ruined his health la buena vida había acabado con su salud (before n) [space/area] destinado a vivienda; [conditions] de vida living standards nivel (m) de vida those are their living quarters ahí es donde viven, esas son sus dependencias we could use this for living quarters podríamos destinar esto a vivienda
    More example sentences
    • Our councils are already doing a fantastic job of developing lifestyle choices and active living.
    • We then calculated degree of cognitive impairment, function in activities of daily living, and behavioural disturbances.
    • Standards of living and lifestyles also became very similar in rural and urban areas.
  • 3 (people) (+ pl vb) the living los vivos
  • 4 c [Relig] beneficio (m)
    More example sentences
    • The second is the Black Death, in which half the livings in the Church changed hands - which tells one something about its impact.
    • Ordained in 1675, Flamsteed received the income of the living of Burstow, Surrey from 1684.
    • In 1487, eager to appease France, Pope Innocent VIII granted James III an ‘indult’, giving him the right to prefer to Scottish livings and higher Church posts.

Definition of living in:

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Word of the day rigor
m
rigor (US), rigour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

Santería is a religious cult, fusing African beliefs and Catholicism, which developed among African Yoruba slaves in Cuba. Followers believe both in a single supreme being and also in orishas, deities who each share an identity with a Christian saint and who combine a force of nature with human characteristics. Rituals involve music, dancing, sacrificial offerings, divination, and going into trances.

There are 2 translations of living in Spanish:

living2

adj

  • (before n) [person/creature] vivo Spain's greatest living painter el pintor vivo más importante de España he was living proof of the power of the media era prueba evidente or palpable del poder de los medios de comunicación she's the living image of Queen Victoria es la viva imagen or el vivo retrato de la reina Victoria a living language una lengua viva hewn from the living rock tallado en la roca viva living dead muertos (mpl) en vida living death muerte (f) en vida living fossil fósil (m) viviente
    More example sentences
    • For their sake, he made them all perish in the next instant, dying as quick as a living creature could possibly.
    • They also had this machine that replicated food so that no living creature had to be killed to keep them alive.
    • The garden was a living, breathing, creature that now seemed intent upon swallowing her up.

Definition of living in:

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Word of the day rigor
m
rigor (US), rigour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

Santería is a religious cult, fusing African beliefs and Catholicism, which developed among African Yoruba slaves in Cuba. Followers believe both in a single supreme being and also in orishas, deities who each share an identity with a Christian saint and who combine a force of nature with human characteristics. Rituals involve music, dancing, sacrificial offerings, divination, and going into trances.