There are 2 translations of lumber in Spanish:

lumber1

Pronunciation: /ˈlʌmbər; ˈlʌmbə(r)/

n

uncountable/no numerable
  • 1.1 (timber) (American English/inglés norteamericano) madera (feminine); (before noun/delante del nombre) [trade/company] maderero lumber mill aserradero (masculine) or (Colombia; Ecuador) aserrío (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • A total of six ships have put in here asking for both furs and lumber in the past two months.
    • A major trade dispute is brewing over the export of Canadian softwood lumber to the United States.
    • Penetrating stains or preservative treatments are preferred for rough sawn lumber.
    1.2 (junk) cachivaches (mpl), trastos (mpl) viejos (before noun/delante del nombre) lumber room trastero (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • I grabbed many cans of Lysol, loaded them into the car, and continued to the storage room where lumber lay about.
    • In trad Japanese houses, this whole thing is supposed to be placed in a special location built for it between the first and second floors, which is not possible in our house, so the image was leaned against a pile of lumber to party with us.
    • Hence perhaps why much is made of the variety of subject matter in Sebald's novels, like a lumber room in a rundown mansion ready for an enthusiast's rummage.

Definition of lumber in:

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Word of the day incansable
adj
tireless …
Cultural fact of the day

Paro is the name in Spain for both unemployment and unemployment benefit. The period for which paro can be claimed ranges from three months to a year, depending on how long a person has been working. The amount paid decreases over the period of unemployment.

There are 2 translations of lumber in Spanish:

lumber2

vt

  • 1 1.1 (burden) [colloquial/familiar] to lumber sb with sth enjaretarle or endilgarle* algo a algn [colloquial/familiar] I got lumbered with the job/the kids me enjaretaron or me endilgaron el trabajo/los niños a mí [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • Given that it is unlikely that the State will wish to be lumbered with the crushing financial burden of this obsolete dinosaur from a decadent age, an interested body of Sligo citizens should be formed immediately.
    • Low cost of ownership through self-tuning, self-management capabilities means suppliers are not lumbered with costly end-user support, and end-users do not have to employ database administrators.
    • The bad news is that, apparently, work at Bow Road is due to continue until July 2005, nine months later than originally planned, so you're lumbered with my regular renovation updates for another year at least.
    1.2 (fill) abarrotar, atestar
  • 2 (chop down) (American English/inglés norteamericano) talar

vi

  • 1 1.1 (move awkwardly) avanzar* pesadamente 1.2
    (lumbering present participle/participio presente)
    [gait/step/footsteps] torpe, pesado
    More example sentences
    • For as long as I can remember, he has looked like an elephant, heavy and lumbering with big ears and baggy wrinkled skin.
    • Not many ordinary people were out on the streets, but there was a heavy population of police and army trucks lumbered ponderously around.
    • Manta rays cruise past, turtles lumber along, sharks scope the scene, the odd octopus creeps along the ocean floor, and further out, the whale sharks make their way north.
  • 2 (cut timber) (American English/inglés norteamericano) aserrar*
    More example sentences
    • As part of the agreement, Pacific Lumber agrees to strict monitoring of and restrictions on lumbering in its other forest holdings.
    • Fishing, like lumbering, was in decline, and enterprises which produced only red ink were being quickly jettisoned by those who didn't like that colour.
    • Fishing and lumbering became major enterprises.

Definition of lumber in:

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Word of the day incansable
adj
tireless …
Cultural fact of the day

Paro is the name in Spain for both unemployment and unemployment benefit. The period for which paro can be claimed ranges from three months to a year, depending on how long a person has been working. The amount paid decreases over the period of unemployment.