Translation of madam in Spanish:

madam

Pronunciation: /ˈmædəm/

n

  • 1.1 (as title) señora (feminine) Dear Madam [Correspondence/Correspondencia] Estimada Señora Madam President/Chairman señora presidenta/directora (as form of address/como título de cortesía) señora
    More example sentences
    • Madam Speaker: Please allow the member to complete his answer in silence.
    • Madam Speaker, we are a city that cares about its future.
    • Madam Secretary, I'll start with you.
    1.2 (of brothel) madam(e) (f), madama (f), regenta (f) (Chile)
    More example sentences
    • As long as brothel madams and their prostitutes paid their monthly fines and sought to keep drunkenness, violence, theft and other disorderly behavior to a minimum, the police left them alone.
    • The 45-year-old mother of four is a millionaire entrepreneur who made her fortune as a brothel madam on the Kalgoorlie goldfields.
    • If you like I could always send a note to Eileen, the madam of the brothel, getting her to collaborate my story.
    1.3 (bossy girl) (British English/inglés británico) [pejorative/peyorativo] she's a proper little madam! mira que aires or importancia se da la mocosa esta [colloquial/familiar] (as form of address/como título de cortesía) señorita
    More example sentences
    • ‘I cannot possibly imagine myself wearing those,’ the proper madam muttered with utmost conviction.
    • Now, young madam, let me wager a month's salary that you, like so many of our sisters these days, are the proud and confident wearer of the latest hipsters.
    • The little madams ' fancy then turned to donkey rides, which were quickly arranged.

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Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.