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madden

Pronunciation: /ˈmædn/

Translation of madden in Spanish:

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • (make angry) enfurecer*; (drive mad) enloquecer* she was maddened by his arrogance su arrogancia la sacaba de quicio maddened by/with pain enloquecido por el dolor/de dolor
    Example sentences
    • JunoFest organizers have been busy like honey maddened bees labouring to bring you, faithful reader, the music you deserve.
    • Everything appears brazen and hard and mighty, suggestive of Angelo's own throbbing spirit and maddened soul.
    • Living in that vile woman's grasp, it was like being watched by a vigilant, maddened cat, always with the claws out, ready to pounce on us.
    Example sentences
    • The more complicated your life gets, the more people you interact with on a daily basis, the more incidents occur that can irritate, annoy, incense, madden, infuriate and enrage.
    • We all need the sustenance of classic and art films that madden, provoke, disturb and challenge us - at least until they come out with the Star Wars II DVD.
    • I will be in DC that day, or I would probably show up and sulk, maddened there were no women on the panel and annoyed at myself for caring.

Definition of madden in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.