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magnification

Pronunciation: /ˌmægnəfəˈkeɪʃən; ˌmægnɪfɪˈkeɪʃən/

Translation of magnification in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 uncountable/no numerable [Optics/Óptica] aumento (masculine) the lens has a magnification of … la lente tiene un aumento de …
    Example sentences
    • Magnification was 50x and a micrometer was photographed with each roll of film to verify magnification after film processing.
    • Each virtual slide contains high and low magnifications, with the ability to change magnification or view multiple focal planes at any location on the slide, not just preselected areas.
    • Based on J. Robert Oppenheimer's theories of quantum mechanics, as well as on Ruska's groundbreaking research, the field emission microscope allowed magnification up to two million times.
    1.2 countable/numerable (copy, photograph) ampliación (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • This is a 4X magnification of the original image.
    • In Berning´s latest exhibitions, various work complexes from the past decade appear alongside medializations of the masterpiece - in catalogs, in libraries, on postcards of artworks, in each case alienated by means of a magnification of the original work or a return to the creative moment of the painting.
    • That is, unlike other spontaneous-drip artists, Pollock created canvases with a single dominant pattern that is repeated, at various magnifications, throughout.

Definition of magnification in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.