There are 3 entries that translate mark into Spanish:

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mark 1

American English: /mɑrk/
British English: /mɑːk/

noun

  • 1 1.1 (sign, symbol) dirty/greasy marks
    manchas de suciedad/grasa
    burn mark scratch mark
    Example sentences
    • Here are some useful sites for anyone needing to display diacritical marks, mathematical symbols, etc.
    • The stress marks might seem quaint to us; but McGuffey believed that rhythm and harmony have not only an aesthetic but also a moral value.
    • Although most of the headstones are severely weathered and illegible, cemetery staff will record all legible marks and inscriptions before removing the stones.
    Example sentences
    • So the fact that this building is expensive is a mark of its quality.
    • Somehow, the brand of the magazine becomes the mark of quality rather than the individual work in it.
    • Flags were flying at half mast as a mark of respect for the Duke of Norfolk who died two days ago at the age of 86, the Arundel ground being part of the Duke's estate.
    1.2 (on body) distinguishing marks she escaped without a mark on her body
    salió sin un arañazo
    the marks of age
    las huellas de la edad
    Example sentences
    • The yellow sponged raked over the arm viciously causing a deep red scuff marks to surface.
    • Looking up, she saw several holes dotted along its surface, burned scorch marks surrounding the edges.
    • Oh boy… did I do a lot of damage… his whole face was either covered in red marks or a bruise.
  • 2 (identifying sign) a mark of quality
    un signo de calidad
    as a mark of respect
    en señal de respeto
    tolerance is the mark of a civilized society
    una sociedad civilizada se distingue por su tolerancia
    it's the mark of a gentleman
    es lo que distingue a un caballero
    to leave o stamp one's mark on somebody/something
    dejar su impronta en alguien/algo
    five years in prison have left their mark
    cinco años en la cárcel le han dejado huella
    to make one's mark
    (make big impression) dejar su impronta
    (lit: on document) firmar con una cruz
  • 3
    (for paper, exam) nota (feminine)
    to give somebody/get a good mark
    ponerle a alguien/sacar una buena nota
    (Sport)
    darle a alguien/obtener un buen puntaje or (especially Spain) una buena puntuación
    she always gets top marks (British English)
    siempre saca las mejores notas or [formal] la máxima calificación
    I give her full marks for trying
    se merece un premio por intentarlo
    no marks for guessing who said that! (British English) [colloquial] [humorous]
    no hace falta ser un genio para saber quién dijo eso
    Example sentences
    • There will be no marks awarded for the answer ‘They both write historical fantasy’.
    • It is possible to discourage guessing by allocating one mark for a correct answer and minus one for an incorrect answer.
    • Although the paper is 80 marks / answer all questions, there is some consolation in that several questions are perennial.
    Example sentences
    • These are some of the terms used to describe children unable to learn or more importantly who score poor marks in their examinations.
    • Researchers discovered that different academics gave different marks for the same essays.
    • The problems in the evaluation system is not limited to the disparity in marks between different universities.
    Example sentences
    • He also helped set three relay world records and lowered his own mark in the 400 freestyle.
    • Thorpe is the current Olympic and triple world champion in the 400 meters and holds three world marks in freestyle distances.
    • In these she recorded marks of 12. 53s and 1. 51m to put her in an overall 14th place.
  • 4 4.1 (indicator) the cost has reached the $100,000 mark
    el costo ha llegado a los 100.000 dólares
    (gas) mark 6 (British English)
    el número 6 (de un horno de gas)
    to be/come up to the mark to overstep the mark
    4.2 (for race) on your marks! o take your marks!
    ¡a sus marcas!
    to be quick/slow off the mark
    ser rápido/lento
  • 5 (target) to be an easy mark [colloquial]
    ser (un) blanco fácil
    $300? $3,000 would be nearer the mark!
    ¿300 dólares? ¡yo diría más bien 3.000!
    to be o fall wide of the mark (lit: arrow)
    no dar en el blanco (por mucho)
    , his estimate was wide of the mark
    erró por mucho en su cálculo
    to hit/miss the mark (insinuation/warning)
    hacer/no hacer mella
    (lit: arrow)
    dar/no dar en el blanco
    Example sentences
    • She threw the last knife she was holding at the target in frustration, not hitting far off from the target mark.
    • This makes it difficult to say when a particular quatrain has missed or hits its mark.
    • As she develops she should be able to reach out and grab an object, even though she often misses the mark on the first try.

transitive verb

  • 1 1.1 (stain, scar)
    (dress/carpet)
    manchar
    dejar (una) marca en
    Example sentences
    • They were faded, some stained by water from rain and a few marked by mud or beer.
    • Her gray dress was torn and dirty, marked more so by several spots of blood.
    • She turned a corner and stopped before colliding into a little boy, face marked with tears.
    1.2 (pattern) (usually passive) the male's throat is marked with two white bars
    el macho tiene dos franjas blancas en el cuello
  • 2 (indicate) the letter was marked 'urgent'
    en el sobre decía or (especially Spain) ponía 'urgente'
    she was marked absent
    le pusieron falta or ausente
    the price is marked on the lid
    el precio va marcado en la tapa
    Example sentences
    • We moored to the buoy that marks the Haven's position, and Gino put the decompression station in place.
    • The position of each station will be marked by a cross.
    • Two large stones also stand almost due east and west to mark the local equinoctial positions of the sun.
  • 3 3.1 (commemorate, signal)
    (anniversary/retirement)
    celebrar
    (beginning/watershed)
    marcar
    señalar
    1997 marks the centenary
    en 1997 se cumple el centenario
    Example sentences
    • Plans are being formulated to hold a celebration event to mark the 10th anniversary of the club next April.
    • This ceremony is supposed to mark an important event in the life of the eunuchs, when they realise their dream of marrying for once.
    • It was the highlight of a series of events held last week to mark the beginning of six months of celebrations to marks the Quakers' important anniversary.
    Example sentences
    • The stage victory marked a reversal of fortunes for the 26-year-old who lost the prologue when his chain came off close to the finish.
    • Because the unit can be traced over several tens of kilometres, we suggest it marks a sub-regionally significant event in the Emeishan Province as basalt production terminated.
    • Ms McGreal said the event marked the end of the ‘talking phase’ for women in agriculture.
    3.2 (characterize) a period marked by constant riots
    un período caracterizado por constantes disturbios
    Example sentences
    • Sargent's work is marked by its exceptional lucidity, its exactness of expression and by the decisiveness of her results.
    • Clough's early works are marked by a subdued palette of largely browns, greys and greens.
    • His subsequent work was marked by an offbeat intensity.
  • 4
    (make corrections in) (paper/exam)
    corregir
    (grade) poner(le) nota a
    calificar
    it was right, but he marked it wrong
    estaba bien, pero lo marcó como erróneo
    he marked my essay 13 out of 20
    me puso 13 sobre 20 en el trabajo
    the judges marked her performance very high (Sport)
    los jueces le dieron un puntaje muy alto or (especially Spain) una puntuación muy alta
    Example sentences
    • Work has been set for him and as far as I'm concerned it's being marked by teachers.
    • She says the programme involved properly supported unit standards marked by trained teachers and assessed to the standard.
    • It also says the initial measurement for seven-year-olds is unreliable as it is marked by teachers rather than external examiners.
    Example sentences
    • In addition, Mid Yorkshire was marked down for not ensuring at least 98 per cent of patients with suspected cancer were seen within two weeks.
    • Like the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Lewisham has been marked down for missing its four-hour A&E waiting time target for 2004 / 5.
    • A Merit would suffice, heck even a Pass would do as I know she's going to mark me down anyway because I slacked big time on the photography bit, but that was a different unit.
  • 5 (heed) (you) mark my words!
    ¡ya verás!
    ¡vas a ver!
    but she has lied before, mark you!
    pero ten en cuenta que nos ha mentido antes
  • 6
    (British English) (Sport)
    marcar
    Example sentences
    • Harrogate were camped in their half for the entire game and despite marking Elliot Dowley ferociously were not able to match his pace and he put away a winner in the nick of time.
    • If he is assigned a player to mark throughout a game, it is almost guaranteed that that player will not have a large impact on the game.
    • Lorraine Pugh had her best performance in the game against Glynn as she was marking their best player Anne-Marie Moloney.
    Example sentences
    • Opening 52 Seconds: Bombers win the ball from the opening bounce and Lucas marks at centre half forward.
    • But in fact, it makes it almost impossible to see which player is marking the ball, as other players swarm around you.

intransitive verb

  • (linen/carpet)
    mancharse

Phrasal verbs

mark down

verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object
1 (write down)
anotar
apuntar
tomar nota de
the teacher marked him down as absent
el profesor le puso falta or ausente
she's been marked down as a future minister
ha sido señalada como futura ministra
2 (Business)
(goods)
rebajar
3
(British English) (School, University)
bajarle la nota a

mark off

verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object
1 (divide off)
(area)
delimitar
(boundary)
demarcar
to mark something off from something
separar or deslindar algo de algo
it is what marks Bach's music off from that of his predecessors
es lo que distingue la música de Bach de la de sus predecesores
2 (check off)
(cross out) tachar

mark out

verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object
1
(sports ground)
marcar
2 (select) 3 (distinguish)

mark up

verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object
1 (note) 2 (Business)
(goods)
aumentar el precio de
3
(British English) (School, University)
subirle la nota a
4
(manuscript)
anotar
5 (soil)
(American English)
ensuciar

Definition of mark in:

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There are 3 entries that translate mark into Spanish:

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mark 2
American English: /mɑrk/
British English: /mɑːk/

noun

  • (Finance, History)
    Example sentences
    • Moreover, the budget was burdened annually to the tune of over 10 billion German marks by the war against the Kurds.
    • Some 7.5 billion of German marks are frozen in state banks.
    • This in turn is equal to 1.95583 German marks, or 6.55957 French francs, or 166.386 Spanish pesetas, and so on.

Definition of mark in:

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There are 3 entries that translate mark into Spanish:

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Mark
American English: /mɑrk/
British English: /mɑːk/

noun

Definition of mark in:

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