Translation of meaty in Spanish:

meaty

Pronunciation: /ˈmiːti/

adj (-tier, -tiest)

  • 1.1 [taste/smell] a carne; [soup/stew] con mucha carne; [rabbit/bone] carnoso, con mucha carne
    More example sentences
    • Then she is bustling away, a whirlwind of activity, testing a pot of meaty soup with a spoon that she pulls out of nowhere, sticking a sliver of wood into a rising cake in an open oven to check that it is cooking.
    • Nodding furiously, he furiously began to start serving the meaty soup to the peasants.
    • In this case, they were far from trendy al dente vegetables and had a rich meaty, sharp flavour, which I would happily have had as a main course.
    1.2 (thick) [hands/arms/shoulders] rollizo
    More example sentences
    • I know she would have hated Marie, and that Marie was everything she wasn't, but I think that was kind of the point; French, tall, slightly meaty, and blonde, Marie is nothing like her.
    • Barnes slaps his meaty hand over the mouth of a soldier screaming from the searing pain of shrapnel and menacingly commands ‘Take the pain!’
    1.3 (having substance) [article/book] sustancioso, enjundioso
    More example sentences
    • To attract a cast like that, Mystic River had to offer some meaty roles.
    • It also offers Woronov her first meaty film role since Bartel's Scenes From the Class Struggle in Beverly Hills 13 years ago.
    • But it lacks the meaty substance of its predecessors, and feels too fluffy, light, and simplistic to truly work.

Definition of meaty in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's War of Independence against Napoleon Bonaparte's French occupation was ignited by the popular revolt in Madrid on 2 May 1808 against the French army. With support from the Duke of Wellington, Spanish resistance continued for over five years in a guerra de guerrillas which gave the world the concept and the term guerrilla warfare. The autocratic Fernando VII was restored to the throne in 1814, and his first act was to abolish the progressive Constitution of Cadiz adopted in 1812.