Translation of mechanics in Spanish:

mechanics

Pronunciation: /məˈkænɪks; mɪˈkænɪks/

noun/nombre

  • 1 (+ singular verb/+ verbo en singular) [Physics/Física] [Mech] mecánica (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • With this work Lagrange transformed mechanics into a branch of mathematical analysis.
    • Dynamics is defined as that branch of mechanics that deals with forces and their relation primarily to motion.
    • He applied mechanics to improve turbines and waterwheels more than doubling the efficiency of the waterwheel.
    More example sentences
    • I put my ear to the floor and hear only the rumble of the mechanics beneath the train and the scrape of the wheels grinding against the iron tracks.
    • We could trace back the mechanics of the machine and learn the mind of God.
    • There are clear, educational explanations of the physics of the tasks and the mechanics of the machines.
    More example sentences
    • Wanting to do more than cobble, he taught himself maths, navigation and practical mechanics.
    • This work was to be in four parts, arithmetic, geometry, mechanics, and hydraulics.
    • The scheme is run chiefly for boys interested in mechanics and mechanical engineering.
  • 2 (+ plural verb/+ verbo en plural) 2.1 (method, practical details) the mechanics los aspectos prácticos 2.2 (mechanical parts) the mechanics el mecanismo there's something wrong with the mechanics hay un problema con el mecanismo, hay un problema mecánico

Definition of mechanics in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.