There are 2 translations of media in Spanish:

media1

Pronunciation: /ˈmiːdiə/

n

  • the media (+ pl or [uso criticado/criticized usage] sing vb) los medios de comunicación or difusión (before n) it has received widespread media attention ha polarizado la atención de los medios de comunicación or difusión, ha recibido amplia atención mediática media coverage cobertura (f) mediática media darling favorito, -ta (m,f) de los medios de comunicación media event acontecimiento (m) mediático media people periodistas (mpl), gente (f) de los medios de comunicación or difusión media personality famoso, -sa (m,f) de los medios de comunicación or difusión media studies periodismo (m)
    More example sentences
    • Politicians should know by now that newspapers or the media do not campaign for any one at all.
    • It is often only the big, single-issue campaigns that capture the media's attention and excite the public.
    • Of course, the most extreme views tend to make the best headlines, so they get all the media and public attention.

Definition of media in:

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Word of the day rigor
m
rigor (US), rigour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

Santería is a religious cult, fusing African beliefs and Catholicism, which developed among African Yoruba slaves in Cuba. Followers believe both in a single supreme being and also in orishas, deities who each share an identity with a Christian saint and who combine a force of nature with human characteristics. Rituals involve music, dancing, sacrificial offerings, divination, and going into trances.

There are 2 translations of media in Spanish:

media2

  • pl of medium2 1 medium2 2

Definition of media in:

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Word of the day rigor
m
rigor (US), rigour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

Santería is a religious cult, fusing African beliefs and Catholicism, which developed among African Yoruba slaves in Cuba. Followers believe both in a single supreme being and also in orishas, deities who each share an identity with a Christian saint and who combine a force of nature with human characteristics. Rituals involve music, dancing, sacrificial offerings, divination, and going into trances.