There are 2 translations of merit in Spanish:

merit1

Pronunciation: /ˈmerət; ˈmerɪt/

n

  • 1 1.1 u (excellence) mérito (m) a man of merit un hombre de mérito a work of artistic merit una obra de mérito artístico he was chosen purely on merit lo eligieron exclusivamente por sus méritos (before n) merit systemsistema de ascensos por méritos 1.2 c (praiseworthy quality) each case is judged on its (own) merits se juzga cada caso individualmente or por separado the plan was accepted on its financial merits se aceptó el plan por sus ventajas económicas each option has its merits and its demerits todas las opciones tienen sus ventajas y desventajas or sus pros y sus contras there is no o isn't any merit in prolonging the dispute no tiene ningún sentido prolongar el conflicto
  • 2 (BrE) [Educ] mención (f) especial to pass with merit aprobar* con mención especial

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Word of the day órbita
f
orbit …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.

There are 2 translations of merit in Spanish:

merit2

vt

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Definition of merit in:

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Word of the day órbita
f
orbit …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.