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microscopic

Pronunciation: /ˌmaɪkrəˈskɑːpɪk; ˌmaɪkrəˈskɒpɪk/

Translation of microscopic in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1.1 (very small) [fragment/organism] microscópico, al microscopio
    Example sentences
    • Seriously, it's an extremely small, microscopic number, and he probably won't notice.
    • It's an epic, but at the heart of it is an extremely detailed and microscopic view of human nature.
    • Is she flipping through a magazine and raving about a microscopic skirt?
    1.2 (meticulous) [examination/investigation] minucioso
    Example sentences
    • With their entire season on the line, Munster would have planned their day in microscopic detail, yet all of their best intentions looked like turning to dust as early as the first 10 minutes.
    • Specific, sometimes microscopic, detail is used here, too, in a kind of a cinematic structure cutting back and forth between the two narratives.
    • And so, let me take this time to list a few of the many microscopic details that make ordinary day to day living worth it all for me.
    1.3 (with microscope) (before noun/delante del nombre) [examination] microscópico, al microscopio
    Example sentences
    • Diarrhoea was defined as watery when the patient passed at least three loose stools per day without visible blood or microscopic red blood and polymorphonuclear cells in the specimen.
    • To their scientists, the visible snow is only a small part of all the settling material that is mostly microscopic and not visible to the naked eye.
    • They feed on microscopic blue green algae plants that only thrive in saline waters.

Definition of microscopic in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.