There are 2 translations of mill in Spanish:

mill1

Pronunciation: /mɪl/

n

  • 1 1.1 (building, machine) molino (m) to go through the mill [person] vérselas* negras [familiar/colloquial], pasarlas duras it can take months for an application to go through the administrative mill el trámite de una solicitud puede llevar meses de papeleo to put sb through the mill hacerle* sudar la gota gorda a algn 1.2 (for pepper etc) molinillo (m)
  • 3 (in (US) ) [Fin] milésima (f) de dólar (unidad usada en el cálculo de impuestos)

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.

There are 2 translations of mill in Spanish:

mill2

vt

vi

  • (circulate) [crowd] dar* vueltas, pulular, arremolinarse a milling crowd un remolino de gente confused thoughts were milling around inside her head pensamientos confusos le daban vueltas en la cabeza or bullían en su cabeza the guests milled about o around outside the church waiting for news los invitados daban vueltas fuera de la iglesia a la espera de noticias

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.