There are 2 translations of mix up in Spanish:

mix up

  • 1verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento 1.1 (combine) [ingredients] mezclar 1.2 (prepare) [paste/paint] preparar 1.3 (throw into confusion) desordenar, revolver* don't get your books mixed up with mine no mezcles tus libros con los míos 1.4 (confuse) [names/dates] confundir to mix sth/sb up with sth/sb confundir algo/a algn con algo/algn I'm always mixing him up with his brother siempre lo confundo con su hermano to mix it up (American English/inglés norteamericano) [colloquial/familiar] pelearse, sacarse* la mugre (Southern Cone/Cono Sur) [colloquial/familiar] 1.5 (bewilder) [person] confundir
  • 2 (usually passive/normalmente en voz pasiva) 2.1 (involve) to be/get mixed up in sth estar* metido or enredado/meterse en algo to be/get mixed up with sb andar* liado/liarse* con algn don't get mixed up with her no te líes con ella 2.2 (confuse) to get mixed up confundirse, hacerse* un lío [colloquial/familiar]
See parent entry: mix

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Cultural fact of the day

Did you know that bable (or asturiano) is a variety of Castilian spoken in Asturias? It went into decline when the kingdom of Castile achieved political dominance and imposed Castilian on what became Spain. By the twentieth century it was confined to rural areas. With the revival of Spanish regional languages

There are 2 translations of mix up in Spanish:

mix-up

Pronunciation: /ˈmɪksʌp/

n

Definition of mix up in:

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Word of the day tuna
f
prickly pear …
Cultural fact of the day

Did you know that bable (or asturiano) is a variety of Castilian spoken in Asturias? It went into decline when the kingdom of Castile achieved political dominance and imposed Castilian on what became Spain. By the twentieth century it was confined to rural areas. With the revival of Spanish regional languages