Translation of modesty in Spanish:

modesty

Pronunciation: /ˈmɑːdəsti; ˈmɒdɪsti/

noun/nombre

uncountable/no numerable
  • 1.1 (absence of conceit) modestia (feminine) I would tell you about it, but modesty forbids te lo contaría, pero pecaría de poco modesto in all modesty, I think … modestamente or con toda modestia, creo que …
    More example sentences
    • He had shown no false modesty about his ability to avoid the gardener.
    • He is intelligent, engaging and nimbly treads the line between humility and false modesty.
    • It's not false modesty, but the viewing nation has had three solid months of me and now they need a break.
    1.2 (limited size) [formal] lo modesto
    More example sentences
    • At the cathedral, Paul and his wife Jenny lived in relative modesty in a part of what was originally built as the bishop's palace.
    • Is the relative modesty of the damages a reflection of the fact that the amount was determined by a judge and not by a jury?
    • His family was quite wealthy, but modesty was what they possessed in great amounts.
    1.3 (propriety) recato (masculine), pudor (masculine) to outrage sb's modesty ofender el pudor de algn
    More example sentences
    • ‘The idea is that your modesty in dress and behavior is a passport to public space,’ he said.
    • But faith in the classical virtues of decorum and modesty remained with him until his death.
    • ‘Since Father is unavailable that would be acceptable,’ she ducked her head in a gesture the steward took as maidenly modesty, but actually was meant to hide her smile.

Definition of modesty in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day sigla
f
abbreviation …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.