Translation of modular in Spanish:

modular

Pronunciation: /ˈmɑːdʒələr; ˈmɒdjʊlə(r)/

adjective/adjetivo

  • [design/furniture] modular, a base de módulos; [degree/course] dividido en módulos [program] [Computing/Informática] modular
    More example sentences
    • Equipped with low level perch seats to discourage beggars and stray animals from cuddling down, the shelters employ modular construction for fast assembling.
    • In the course of doing this, it has transformed itself into one of Britain's leading experts on designing, costing, project managing and financing modular construction.
    • On this note, it might have been beneficial to include a few of the artist's recent modular, design-oriented constructions of wood and paint.
    More example sentences
    • The courses have become more modular, with more emphasis on coursework and continuous assessment, and less on exams at the end of two years.
    • And this occurred just after we had returned to teaching separate science GCSEs, after spending a considerable number of years teaching a modular combined science course.
    • Seminaries offer evening classes, weekend modular courses and occasional meetings in smaller cohorts in church basements.

Definition of modular in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.