There are 2 translations of moonlight in Spanish:

moonlight1

Pronunciation: /ˈmuːnlaɪt/

n

u
  • luz (f) de la luna by moonlight a la luz de la luna, al claro de luna [literario/literary]
    More example sentences
    • The pale moonlight shone on the sand as Kino stepped among the dunes.
    • The sky was bright with moonlight.
    • The room was dark, but the blinds were open, and the woman in the bed was bathed in the cold white light of moonlight.

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Definition of moonlight in:

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Word of the day lámpara
f
lamp …
Cultural fact of the day

Sanfermines (The festival of San Fermín) is from 6th-14th July and el encierro (the 'running of the bulls'), takes place in Pamplona in northern Spain. The animals are released into the barricaded streets and people run in front of them, in honor of the town´s patron saint, San Fermín, who was put to death by being dragged by bulls.

There are 2 translations of moonlight in Spanish:

moonlight2

vi

  • tener* un segundo empleo, estar* pluriempleado he moonlights as a cab driver trabaja además como taxista
    More example sentences
    • To support himself during the first few months, he found work moonlighting as a telemarketer and cutting down trees on weekends.
    • After college, he took a job as an accountant and - to supplement his income - moonlighted as a basketball and football referee.
    • Although medical care was free, many health care professionals moonlighted to make extra money because official health care usually involved long lines and waiting lists.

More definitions of moonlight

Definition of moonlight in:

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Word of the day lámpara
f
lamp …
Cultural fact of the day

Sanfermines (The festival of San Fermín) is from 6th-14th July and el encierro (the 'running of the bulls'), takes place in Pamplona in northern Spain. The animals are released into the barricaded streets and people run in front of them, in honor of the town´s patron saint, San Fermín, who was put to death by being dragged by bulls.