Share this entry

Share this page

muscle

Pronunciation: /ˈmʌsəl/

Translation of muscle in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 c and u [Anatomy/Anatomía] músculo (masculine) feel this, it's all muscle toca, es todo músculo don't move a muscle! ¡no te muevas!, ¡no muevas ni un pelo! [colloquial/familiar]
    Example sentences
    • The powerful venom acts on the victim's voluntary muscles, paralysing the muscles required for body movement and breathing.
    • Make sure you get sufficient protein to protect not only your bones, but your muscles and other body tissues.
    • Each time the calf and thigh muscles contract when walking, veins deep inside the leg are squeezed.
    1.2 uncountable/no numerable (power) fuerza (feminine), poder (masculine) efectivo they have no political muscle políticamente, no tienen influencia they showed their muscle demostraron su fuerza or el poder que realmente tienen
    Example sentences
    • We've power of muscle and brain, and where else is that combination useful?
    • A matter of a difference in opinion should not be settled with muscle rather than the brain.
    • But without our brain and muscle not a single wheel can turn.

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

(American English/inglés norteamericano) [colloquial/familiar]
  • 1 [baggage] llevar a pulso
  • 2 [baseball] golpear con fuerza

Phrasal verbs

muscle in

verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio
[colloquial/familiar] meterse por medio ([ con prepotencia ])to muscle in on sth a rival company muscled in on their market una compañía de la competencia se introdujo en su sector del mercado

Definition of muscle in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day papista
adj
papist …
Cultural fact of the day

A piñata is a hollow figure made of cardboard, or from a clay pot lined with colored paper. Filled with fruit, candy, toys, etc, and hung up at parties, people take turns to stand in front of them blindfolded and try to break them with a stick. They feature in Mexican posadas posada and in children's parties there, in Cuba and in Spain.