Translation of mutual in Spanish:

mutual

Pronunciation: /ˈmjuːtʃuəl/

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1.1 (reciprocal) [affection/loathing/respect/help] mutuo the feeling is mutual el sentimiento es mutuo or correspondido
    More example sentences
    • ‘We met around town in Detroit and just had a mutual admiration and respect, then just sort of gravitated toward one another,’ says Benson.
    • But this has not affected the mutual love and respect he and his children feel for one another.
    • Dara seemed to have mutual feelings toward it since she whipped out her newly charged cell phone and began punching in numbers.
    1.2 (shared, common) (before noun/delante del nombre) [friend/enemy] común by mutual agreement de común acuerdo the arrangement will be to our mutual benefit el arreglo será beneficioso para ambos/para todos we have a mutual interest in opera compartimos el mismo interés por la ópera, a ambos/a todos nos interesa la ópera
    More example sentences
    • Men preferred friends with mutual acquaintances and common interests, while women valued laughter, honesty and trust.
    • But we had mutual friends in common, and the most significant one was this chap, James Coldhurst.
    • He waived the hourly fee after discovering a mutual common interest in the gym.
    1.3 [Finance] mutual benefit society mutualidad (feminine), sociedad (feminine) mutualista, mutual (feminine) (Southern Cone/Cono Sur) , mutualista (feminine) (Urug) mutual savings bank caja (feminine) de ahorros mutuos
    More example sentences
    • Deep in Glasgow's business district, nearly all the grand former building societies, mutual associations and insurance offices have been transformed into eateries and drinkeries.
    • Furthermore, several building societies and mutual life assurance companies have converted to listed companies over the past fifteen years, providing windfall shares to their members.
    • In previous years, building societies and mutual companies (those without shareholders) usually dominated these annual surveys of the cheapest lenders.

Definition of mutual in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day airoso
adj
graceful …
Cultural fact of the day

Gringo is a pejorative term in Latin America to refer to white English speakers, particularly North Americans. It has overtones of US intervention in Latin American internal affairs. In the eighteenth century the word was applied to foreigners who spoke little or no Spanish.