There are 2 translations of nark in Spanish:

nark1

Pronunciation: /nɑːrk; nɑːk/

n

  • (British English/inglés británico) [colloquial, dated/familiar, anticuado] (copper's) nark soplón, (masculine, feminine) [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • The opprobrium that once attached to informers, snitches, snouts, shoppers and narks in all walks of life no longer exists.
    • I wonder if the Canadian police could consider invoicing narks directly?
    • Then the copper whips off a little advert looking for narks to come forward over this purely political offence.

Definition of nark in:

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Word of the day insensible
adj
insensitive …
Cultural fact of the day

In Mexico, today is Conmemoración de la Proclamación de la Independencia. Throughout the country, at 11 o'clock at night, there is a communal shout, El Grito, in memory of Padre Hidalgo's cry of independence from the Spanish in the town of Dolores.

There are 2 translations of nark in Spanish:

nark2

vt

  • (British English/inglés británico) [colloquial/familiar], cabrear [colloquial/familiar], encabronar (Spain, Mexico/España, México) [vulgar] to get narked cabrearse or (Spain, Mexico/España, México) [vulgar] encabronarse [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • I'd put in eight weeks of training, but the controversy has narked me a bit.
    • This narked a few people, including his apparently unpaid vet and a group who claimed that the animals on his ranch were being treated cruelly.
    • So, well done, your girlfriend, for finding a humorous card that actually did the trick - and I'm not at all surprised that she's narked that you just chucked it out.

Definition of nark in:

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Word of the day insensible
adj
insensitive …
Cultural fact of the day

In Mexico, today is Conmemoración de la Proclamación de la Independencia. Throughout the country, at 11 o'clock at night, there is a communal shout, El Grito, in memory of Padre Hidalgo's cry of independence from the Spanish in the town of Dolores.