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nasty
American English: /ˈnæsti/
British English: /ˈnɑːsti/

Translation of nasty in Spanish:

adjective -tier, -tiest

  • 1 1.1 (repugnant)
    (taste/smell/medicine)
    it smells nasty
    huele horrible
    tiene un olor asqueroso or repugnante
    don't touch, it's nasty (to child)
    no toques, ¡caca! [colloquial]
    Example sentences
    • Just too many nasty trick questions and annoying video clips of past statements, but that's why you get the big money.
    • Unfortunately, this type of viewing can become a nasty habit that, in the end, sabotages any meaningful engagement with sports.
    • Unfortunately, plenty of investors develop the nasty habit of boasting of their gains instead of contemplating possible overvaluation concerns.
    1.2 (obscene, offensive)
    (film/book)
    Example sentences
    • Joe tried to look as his normal-self again; but his mind kept exploding with nasty thoughts towards the girl, Laura.
    • I want to think of something to insult you at the moment, but nothing comes to mind that's nasty enough not to compliment you.
    • He was a miserable little narrow minded bigot with a nasty temper.
  • 2 (spiteful)
    (person)
    that was a nasty thing to say!
    fue una maldad decirle eso
    they are really nasty to her
    son realmente malos or crueles con ella
    to have a nasty temper
    tener muy mal carácter
    what a nasty trick!
    ¡qué canallada!
    children can be so nasty!
    los niños pueden ser de lo más crueles
    he turns very nasty when he gets drunk
    se pone de lo más desagradable cuando se emborracha
    piece 2
    Example sentences
    • A voice that was nasty and spiteful, leaping at any chance to cause her pain.
    • His imperialists are often nasty folk who behaved horribly towards the natives under their yoke.
    • Not just a grudge, but a hateful, vindictive, nasty bitterness that I didn't even know existed until this person's name was brought up.
  • 3 3.1 (severe)
    (cut/injury/cough)
    (accident)
    (stronger)
    I had a nasty shock
    me llevé una sorpresa de lo más desagradable
    the weather turned nasty
    el tiempo se puso horrible or feísimo
    3.2 (difficult, dangerous)
    (question/exam)
    muy difícil
    (corner/intersection)
    muy peligroso
    3.3 (unpleasant)
    (situation/experience)
    the situation turned nasty
    la cosa se puso fea [colloquial]
    Example sentences
    • Through careful planning people can avoid inheritance tax, which can come as a nasty shock at what is bound to be an upsetting time.
    • Publishers, apparently, found it a nasty shock to be ‘up against someone whose skill in driving a bargain equalled if not excelled their own’.
    • For those who enjoy eating out (or eating in with a takeaway) and thought that by avoiding junk food they could do so healthily, this will have come as a nasty shock.

noun plural -ties

  • (especially British English) [colloquial]hidden nasties
    sorpresas (feminine plural) desagradables
    Example sentences
    • The problem with these nasties is that they lack motivation: it's impossible to tell whether they act out of naïvety, malice or both.
    • Yet despite the presence of molds, bacteria, and other nasties, most archaeological sites, including tombs, have proven safe for science and tourism alike.
    • The land tax sting is going to be quite a political nasty.

Definition of nasty in:

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    Word of the day doofus
    Pronunciation: ˈduːfʌs
    noun
    a stupid person
    Cultural fact of the day

    onces

    In some Andean countries, particularly Chile, onces is a light meal eaten between five and six p.m., the equivalent of "afternoon tea" in Britain. In Colombia, on the other hand, onces is a light snack eaten between breakfast and lunch. It is also known as mediasnueves.