There are 2 translations of next door in Spanish:

next door

adv

  • al lado who lives next door? ¿quién vive al lado or en la casa de al lado? next door to sb/sth al lado de algn/algo the people next door los vecinos (de al lado) the boy/girl next door el chico/la chica de al lado
    More example sentences
    • You'll dine like a king and probably want to build a house next door just so you can pop in every day for lunch.
    • He took up so much room we moved him to the house next door, which was empty.
    • The meeting house will be similar in size to The Fox public house next door and will have parking for 28 cars.

Definition of next door in:

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.

There are 2 translations of next door in Spanish:

next-door

Pronunciation: /ˈneksˈdɔːr; ˈneksdɔː(r)/

adj

  • (before noun/delante del nombre) de al lado our next-door neighbors nuestros vecinos de al lado
    More example sentences
    • My daughter Rebecca was the only eye witness to the murder of her grandmother by a next-door neighbour in 1995.
    • When she was nearly 80, my dear old mum would skip down the garden, jump on to a bench and hop over the wall to check on her next-door neighbour.
    • A burglar who twice crept through a roof space to raid his next-door neighbour's house has been jailed for 15 months.

Definition of next door in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.