Share this entry

Share this page

nick

Pronunciation: /nɪk/

Translation of nick in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1 (notch — in wood) muesca (feminine), hendidura (feminine); (— in blade) mella (feminine) did you cut yourself? — it's just a little nick ¿te cortaste? — es solo un rasguño in the nick of time justo a tiempo
    Example sentences
    • Like the old rifles, the rear sight bears a tiny nick of a sighting notch.
    • There are few film defects such as nicks or blemishes to be seen.
    • The picture suffers from numerous source defects, including many nicks and scratches, a generally dirty appearance, and discolored film elements.
  • 2 (condition) (British English/inglés británico) [colloquial/familiar] to be in good/bad nick estar* en buen/mal estado

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1 (notch) hacer* una muesca en I nicked myself shaving me corté al afeitarme
  • 3 (catch, arrest) (British English/inglés británico) [slang/argot] they got nicked los agarraron [colloquial/familiar] or (South America/América del Sur) [slang/argot] se los llevaron en cana or (Spain/España) [slang/argot] los trincaron or (Mexico/México) [slang/argot] los apañaron

Definition of nick in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day trocha
f
path …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain's literary renaissance, known as the Golden Age (Siglo de Oro/i>), roughly covers the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It includes the Italian-influenced poetry of figures such as Garcilaso de la Vega; the religious verse of Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Ávila and San Juan de la Cruz; picaresque novels such as the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes and Quevedo's Buscón; Miguel de Cervantes' immortal Don Quijote; the theater of Lope de Vega, and the ornate poetry of Luis de Góngora.