There are 2 translations of nip in Spanish:

nip1

Pronunciation: /nɪp/

n

  • 1 1.1 (pinch) pellizco (m); (bite) mordisco (m) to give sb a nip (pinch) pellizcar* a algn (bite) mordisquear a algn
    More example sentences
    • His fair hand made a gesture to touch the dog's face but was rewarded by a painful nip from her sharp fangs.
    • She sighed and looked on dreamily, before receiving a sharp nip on the ear.
    • Herding the neighborhood kids and giving an occasional light nip to a rear end or ankle might seem like a funny game in the beginning.
    1.2 (chill) there's a nip in the air hace bastante fresco 1.3 (tang) (AmE) sabor (m) fuerte
  • 2 (drink) traguito (m) [familiar/colloquial], dedal (m) [familiar/colloquial]
    More example sentences
    • The first few nights Mom slipped me half a Vicodin and a nip of Benedictine brandy.
    • But even with the comfort of a fully underwritten share offer, Allan would be forgiven for reaching for a nip of Armenian brandy himself in the next few days.
    • For a squeamish diary writer it was enough to send me to the editor's well-stocked drinks cabinet for a nip of his favourite barley wine.
  • 3
    (Nip)
    (Japanese) [sl & offensive] japonés, -nesa (m,f), japo (mf) [fam & ofensivo], nipón, -pona (m,f)

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Word of the day lámpara
f
lamp …
Cultural fact of the day

Sanfermines (The festival of San Fermín) is from 6th-14th July and el encierro (the 'running of the bulls'), takes place in Pamplona in northern Spain. The animals are released into the barricaded streets and people run in front of them, in honor of the town´s patron saint, San Fermín, who was put to death by being dragged by bulls.

There are 2 translations of nip in Spanish:

nip2

(-pp-)

vt

  • 1.1 (pinch) pellizcar*; (bite) mordisquear the icy wind nipped our cheeks el viento helado nos cortaba las mejillas she nipped her finger in the door se pilló el dedo con la puerta
    More example sentences
    • They chase off clownfish that don't fit into the hierarchy and many scuba divers tell anecdotes of being nipped at if they venture too close.
    • The dogs nipped at her heels, the silver dusk rose up as her feet sped on.
    • My dog recently bit / nipped me, should I be worried about rabies?
    1.2 (damage) [frost] quemar
    More example sentences
    • But they did and because the weather has been mild, Jane hasn't had to worry about new leaves being nipped by late frosts.
    • It was so cold that the frost nipped at your nose while wrapped in a scarf.
    • What has happened to Sheila's tree every year is that it has been nipped by a late frost.
    1.3 (steal) (AmE) [colloquial/familiar], birlar [familiar/colloquial], afanarse [argot/slang], mangar* (Esp) [familiar/colloquial], volar* (Méx, Ven) [familiar/colloquial]
    More example sentences
    • You might then want to nip quickly outside to see how the people of Leystonstone see the mosaics from various entrances.
    • I quickly nip back in my room to put on my sneakers when the Scottish roommate informs me that the girlfriend has locked herself in his room.
    • Bo managed to get past the bar without succumbing to nipping quickly through it's heavy wood doors.
    More example sentences
    • Ever nipped a spoon or a napkin from a restaurant?

vi

  • 1 (bite, snap) to nip at sth [dog] mordisquear algo
  • 2 (go quickly) (BrE) [colloquial/familiar] I'll nip home at lunchtime me haré una escapadita a casa al mediodía [familiar/colloquial] a taxi nipped in in front of me se me coló un taxi delante nip upstairs and fetch my pipe sube un momento a buscarme la pipa to nip out salir* un momento

More definitions of nip

Definition of nip in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

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Word of the day lámpara
f
lamp …
Cultural fact of the day

Sanfermines (The festival of San Fermín) is from 6th-14th July and el encierro (the 'running of the bulls'), takes place in Pamplona in northern Spain. The animals are released into the barricaded streets and people run in front of them, in honor of the town´s patron saint, San Fermín, who was put to death by being dragged by bulls.