Translation of norm in Spanish:

norm

Pronunciation: /nɔːrm; nɔːm/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 (standard, rule) norma (feminine) social norms normas sociales
    More example sentences
    • It is easy to assume that these new roles lead to strains on the elderly in that: they must adapt to changes in social norms and acceptable behavioral standards.
    • The distortion and utter disregard for social norms, anti-social behaviour and altered family values, are some of the manifestations of this phenomenon.
    • You may not conform to social norms and patterns.
    More example sentences
    • Now more than ever, the level of detail on every garment has become a requirement, and may soon reach the norm.
    • Action will be taken against those who fail to comply with the norm.
    • Many teachers themselves believe that 70 hours a week is the norm, and is required of them.
    1.2 (average) the norm lo normal that's not the norm eso no es lo normal to deviate from the norm apartarse de la norma or de lo normal
    More example sentences
    • Upper class or not, women must not assume that just because Caesarians have become the norm, it's normal.
    • Testing has long impeded all groups of minority students, and is a strong barrier to the success of minorities in schools where standardized testing is the norm.
    • We challenge you to join us in creating healthy work environments by making these standards the norm.

Definition of norm in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day sigla
f
abbreviation …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.