Translation of nth in Spanish:

nth

Pronunciation: /enθ/

adj

(before n)
  • 1.1 [Math] enésimo
    More example sentences
    • In 1865 Fuchs studied nth order linear ordinary differential equations with complex functions as coefficients.
    • Euler starts with an nth degree polynomial p with the following properties.
    • Although not the first to do so, al-Kashi gave an algorithm for calculating nth roots which is a special case of the methods given many centuries later by Ruffini and Horner.
    1.2 [colloquial/familiar] unreliable to the nth degree informal hasta decir basta [familiar/colloquial] you're the nth person to ask me that (BrE) eres la enésima persona que me pregunta eso
    More example sentences
    • Now, Irishness seems to include fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth, nth generations of so-called ‘Irish people’ - and it is these ‘lost Irish’ who are being targeted to tick the box in the census.
    • But we are once again dealing with nth generation reproduction, without any remastering or reconfiguration.
    • While I'm not keen on the notion that we're all dependent on something in these addiction-obsessed times, I know that my fondness for adrenaline-surfing exceeds healthy limits and that (for the nth time) I need to Do Something About It.

Definition of nth in:

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Cultural fact of the day

peronismo is a political movement, known officially as justicialismo, named for the populist politician Colonel Juan Domingo Perón, elected President of Argentina in 1946. An admirer of Italian fascism, Perón claimed always to be a champion of the workers and the poor, the descamisados (shirtless ones), to whom his first wife Eva Duarte (`Evita') became a kind of icon, especially after her death in 1952. Although he instituted some social reforms, Perón's regime proved increasingly repressive and he was ousted by the army in 1955. He returned from exile to become president in 1973, but died in office a year later. The Partido Justicialista has governed Argentina almost continuously since 1989, under Presidents Carlos Menem, Néstor Kirchner, and Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, Néstor Kirchner's widow, who was re-elected President in 2011.