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oatmeal

Pronunciation: /ˈəʊtmiːl/

Translation of oatmeal in Spanish:

noun/nombre

uncountable/no numerable
  • 1.1 [Cookery/Cocina] (flour) harina (feminine) de avena; (flakes) (American English/inglés norteamericano) avena (feminine) ([ en copos ])
    Example sentences
    • Try to get as much fiber as you can from bodybuilding foods such as oatmeal, brown rice, whole-grain breads, vegetables, legumes and fruit.
    • For breakfast people may eat porridge made of cornmeal or oatmeal, cereal, or bread and tea.
    • Complex carbohydrates like oatmeal and whole wheat bread ultimately break down into simple carbohydrates like sugar.
    Example sentences
    • He replaced his morning eggs and sausage with oatmeal and a walk.
    • Aunt Neal had already began pouring me a bowl of oatmeal, putting sausage on a plate and shoveling a pound of bacon in the same saucer.
    • In the morning, I vary between oatmeal and egg white omelets with salsa and veggies, and in the summer I like cold cereals.
    1.2 (color) beige (masculine) crudo; (before noun/delante del nombre) beige crudo (invariable adjective/adjetivo invariable)
    Example sentences
    • It is decorated in cream with an oatmeal carpet, a colour scheme that is continued throughout the apartment.
    • Neutral oatmeal carpets create a subtle contrast to the light maple furniture.
    • When she finished and made her way slowly through the carriage, the only person who gave her money was a bearded guy with long hair and a flowing oatmeal coloured floorlength robe sitting in the corner.

Definition of oatmeal in:

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Cultural fact of the day

A piñata is a hollow figure made of cardboard, or from a clay pot lined with colored paper. Filled with fruit, candy, toys, etc, and hung up at parties, people take turns to stand in front of them blindfolded and try to break them with a stick. They feature in Mexican posadas posada and in children's parties there, in Cuba and in Spain.