Translation of octet in Spanish:

octet

Pronunciation: /ɑːkˈtet; ɒkˈtet/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 [Music/Música] octeto (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • The first couple octets are the manufacturer, the middle are the device, and the final are like serial numbers.
    • Gaurav is an active member in the comedy octet, The Other Guys.
    • I could only hope the squabbling octet did not end up at the same resort.
    More example sentences
    • Jamil Sheriff is the pianist with Joel's band and he will be taking his own octet to Leeds College of Music on Wednesday.
    • John of Gaunt entered five groups in this year's regional festival including its wind band, low brass ensemble and trombone octet.
    • The octet will go on to perform the Dvorak anniversary concert at Castle Howard on Tuesday.
    More example sentences
    • In my continuing education I learned that Mendelssohn orchestrated the scherzo of his octet.
    • Arriaga was second fiddle in a string quartet at nine years of age, and two years later wrote an octet.
    • Burney recorded that his instrumental works - symphonies, concertos, octets, quartets, and trios - were as popular as his vocal music.
    1.2 [Literat] octava (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • In the first huitain (an octet that rhymes ababbcbc) de Pisan declares her personal voice as the narrator.
    • Here is the octet as it is called, the first eight lines of the sonnet.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.