Translation of old man in Spanish:

old man

noun/nombre

[colloquial/familiar]
  • 1.1my/her old man (father) mi/su viejo [colloquial/familiar] (husband) mi/su marido, mi/su viejo (Mexico/México) [colloquial/familiar] 1.2 (boss) the old man el jefe or patrón 1.3 (especially British English/especialmente inglés británico) [dated/anticuado], (as form of address/como título de cortesía) viejo [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • Its great to drink with your old man on fathers day
    • So, your old man's a fraud
    • Give your old man a kiss
    More example sentences
    • Dressed, we walked down to the office where the old man was already pouring a drink.
    • Willie takes over the business but admits the old man as silent partner, as the two younger daughters become free to marry.
    • And not to forget that as long as the old man is still the President of Swapo, all of us are actually financing the activities of Swapo.
    More example sentences
    • When asked by a policeman why he did it he replied, ‘sheer high spirits, old man.’
    • Between you and me, old man, I'm glad they got me before it went any further.
    • Well, they are your patrons, old man, so they do have some right to demand work from you.
    More example sentences
    • The courtesans gathered, musicians played, and a feast like none had before witnessed was prepared to welcome back the Prince and to celebrate old man Clemantini.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.