Translation of outrageous in Spanish:

outrageous

Pronunciation: /aʊtˈreɪdʒəs/

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1.1 (scandalous) [behavior/state of affairs] vergonzoso, escandaloso, atroz; [injustice] indignante, atroz; [manners/language] injurioso; [demands/price] escandaloso, exorbitante, abusivo how dare you! this is outrageous! ¡cómo te atreves! ¡esto es intolerable! it is outrageous that we should be expected to pay es escandaloso que pretendan que paguemos nosotros
    More example sentences
    • This is, as been stated, one of the most outrageous acts I have ever seen.
    • We need the people who are responsible for these stupid and outrageous acts to come to their senses and put a stop to it.
    • It was an outrageous act and what was really upsetting from my point of view is that the referee did not look at it.
    More example sentences
    • He was bold, outrageous, witty, shocking and sympathetic without being the least bit soppy or sentimental.
    • It is a target rather than an outrageous boast, but should he achieve it, perhaps then he will be considered by observers to be an unqualified success.
    • It reminds me of being a student when I used to wear mildly outrageous things, rather than the standard business attire I wear nowadays.
    1.2 (unconventional) [clothes] extravagante, estrafalario; [comedy] graciosísimo he tries hard to be outrageous se esfuerza por resultar atrevido or por escandalizar

Definition of outrageous in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.