Translation of overground in Spanish:

overground

Pronunciation: /ˈəʊvərgraʊnd; ˈəʊvəgraʊnd/

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1 (above ground) (before noun/delante del nombre) [train/station] de superficie
    More example sentences
    • It's a bit like riding the London tube when it goes overground out in the suburbs.
    • Here, both with Tube trains and overground commuter trains, it's increasingly a story of delays, horrendous overcrowding and reduced off-peak services.
    • I tracked down the local overground station, only to find that this part of London merits merely two trains an hour, and so sat freezing on the platform until my deliverer arrived.
  • 2 (mainstream) [colloquial/familiar] [fashion/music/film] convencional
    More example sentences
    • Sawhney is also working on a commission from the BBC for a piece to be played at the Proms - and you don't get much more overground than that.
    • The second was an overground pop smash, with a groovy state-of-the-art video that got everyone talking.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.