Translation of overrun in Spanish:

overrun

transitive verb/verbo transitivo (past tense of/pasado de -ran past participle of/participio pasado de, -run)

/ˌəʊvərˈrʌn; ˌəʊvəˈrʌn/
  • 1.1 (invade, swarm over) invadir to be overrun with sth estar* plagado de algo the place was overrun with cockroaches el lugar estaba plagado or infestado de cucarachas
    More example sentences
    • The aftermath of the war also means that the city isn't overrun by tourists and there are few places selling tacky souvenirs at inflated prices.
    • A wicked mayor plans to overrun the town with rats, close the local primary school and convert it into loft apartments.
    • The site was overrun by rats which is why they brought the rifle.
    1.2 (exceed) exceder
    More example sentences
    • With Scottish elections due next year and the devolved parliament already under fire for costs overrunning on its new building, that would be a severe blow to devolution.
    • Later on we learned that Cornelius had been allowed to overrun by an hour, curfew be damned.
    • The finance minister insisted it was a myth that major projects such as the building of Dublin's port tunnel habitually overran to the cost of several hundred million euros.

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo (past tense of/pasado de -ran past participle of/participio pasado de, -run)

/ˌəʊvərˈrʌn; ˌəʊvəˈrʌn/
  • the meeting overran by half an hour la reunión se prolongó media hora más de lo previsto

noun/nombre

/ˈəʊvərrʌn; ˈəʊvərʌn/
  • we will not allow any budget overruns no admitiremos que se exceda or se rebase el presupuesto the article had a 400-word overrun el artículo sobrepasaba en 400 palabras la longitud establecida

Definition of overrun in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.