Translation of oyster in Spanish:

oyster

Pronunciation: /ˈɔɪstər; ˈɔɪstə(r)/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 countable/numerable [Cookery/Cocina] [Zoology/Zoología] ostra (feminine), ostión (masculine) (Mexico/México) ; (before noun/delante del nombre) [shell] de ostra or (Mexico/México) de ostión
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    • Loch Fyne is Scotland's longest and deepest sea loch, and at its head, the Loch Fyne Oysters company farms oysters and mussels for consumption in its own restaurants as well as in many others in Britain.
    • They discovered that small beads could be carved out of the shells of freshwater mussels and inserted into oysters to artificially form pearls.
    • Bivalves like oysters, mussels and scallops are particularly prone to contamination because of the way they feed.
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    • Turn the chicken and cut from the tail to the head to remove the leg from the carcass and pop out the oyster.
    • Tip the bird over slightly, and with the point of the knife remove the oyster and the small dark portion found on the side-bone.
    1.2 uncountable/no numerable (color) color (masculine) perla; (before noun/delante del nombre) color perla (invariable adjective/adjetivo invariable)
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    • If you don't want to go beyond white, update your color with tone-on-tone neutrals like ecru, oyster, almond or biscuit.
    • While Tisci focused on black and oyster, Lacroix used a vast array of colors and along with the rich details of beads, laces, corsets, flounces and satin.
    • Suit colours for the summer include stone, muted grey, cream and oyster.

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Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.