Translation of panoply in Spanish:

panoply

Pronunciation: /ˈpænəpli/

noun/nombre (plural -plies)

  • 1.1 (array) [formal] colección (feminine) there is already a whole panoply of laws to deal with such offenses ya existe toda una colección de leyes que rigen tales delitos
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    • The proclaimed Jewish nature of the state is reinforced by a panoply of laws ranging from a ban on mixed marriages to over 90 per cent of the land and property in Israel being reserved for Jews.
    • The resulting panoply of data has become the basis of an ambitious commercial service that IBM recently launched called WebFountain.
    • Kota Kinabalu has a panoply of starred and budget hotels ranging from the ultra luxurious to non-star accommodation.
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    • The truth is that she belonged to an almost unimaginable past, one that has gone for ever; it is also a country inhabited by those who wanted the full panoply of Victorian mourning for the grandmother they never knew.
    • The smiths, resplendent in the full panoply of Tuareg costume, had organised a dance in a dusty street that backed onto the hotel kitchen.
    • Alongside, on a watch face, time has stood still; beneath it, in a panoply of colour, things begin to disintegrate into abstraction.
    1.2 (armor) [History/Historia] panoplia (feminine)
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    • In most parts of Greece, the main armed force consisted of hoplites, heavy infantry, each armed with a single thrusting spear and sword, and protected by a panoply of bronze armour.
    • As a weak or crippled body derives no advantage from a panoply of armour, which it will rather discard as being unable to bear it, so, in the same manner, a vigorous body causes affliction to a diseased soul by not being in conformity with its existing circumstances.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.