Translation of panoply in Spanish:

panoply

Pronunciation: /ˈpænəpli/

n (plural -plies)

  • 1.1 (array) [formal] colección (feminine) there is already a whole panoply of laws to deal with such offenses ya existe toda una colección de leyes que rigen tales delitos
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    • The proclaimed Jewish nature of the state is reinforced by a panoply of laws ranging from a ban on mixed marriages to over 90 per cent of the land and property in Israel being reserved for Jews.
    • The resulting panoply of data has become the basis of an ambitious commercial service that IBM recently launched called WebFountain.
    • Kota Kinabalu has a panoply of starred and budget hotels ranging from the ultra luxurious to non-star accommodation.
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    • The truth is that she belonged to an almost unimaginable past, one that has gone for ever; it is also a country inhabited by those who wanted the full panoply of Victorian mourning for the grandmother they never knew.
    • The smiths, resplendent in the full panoply of Tuareg costume, had organised a dance in a dusty street that backed onto the hotel kitchen.
    • Alongside, on a watch face, time has stood still; beneath it, in a panoply of colour, things begin to disintegrate into abstraction.
    1.2 (armor) [History/Historia] panoplia (feminine)
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    • In most parts of Greece, the main armed force consisted of hoplites, heavy infantry, each armed with a single thrusting spear and sword, and protected by a panoply of bronze armour.
    • As a weak or crippled body derives no advantage from a panoply of armour, which it will rather discard as being unable to bear it, so, in the same manner, a vigorous body causes affliction to a diseased soul by not being in conformity with its existing circumstances.

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Word of the day pegado
adj
su casa está pegada a la mía = her house is right next to mine …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a privately owned school that receives no government funds is called a colegio privado. Parents pay monthly fees. Colegios privados cover all stages of primary and secondary education.