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pashmina

Pronunciation: /pæʃˈmiːnə/

Translation of pashmina in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (material) pashmina (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • Most of them are Tibetan refugees, living on the raising of yaks, sheep and particularly goats whose wool, treated in a special manner, takes on the magic conjured by the name pashmina, also called Cashmere.
    • For a touch of luxury, The Cashmere Store in Shambles has pashmina stoles for £59 rather than £99.
    • The pashmina wool obtained from the neck and underbelly of the ibex living in Ladakh and the Tibetian plateaux is much sought after for weaving classic soft shawls, and the animals are not killed for their wool.
    1.2 countable/numerable (shawl) chal (masculine) de pashmina, pashmina (masculine); (scarf) bufanda (feminine) de pashmina
    Example sentences
    • The markets are great places to purchase leather bags, belts and jackets, jewellery, pashminas, stationary and accessories.
    • I myself gave it a whirl, but counting was never my strong point, so I failed to progress beyond impossibly wide and long scarves - pashminas for a Siberian climate, if you like.
    • I'm not the type to wear pashminas and other things round my shoulders so I've had a nightmare trying to find something I like.

Definition of pashmina in:

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