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paternal

Pronunciation: /pəˈtɜːrnl; pəˈtɜːn/

Translation of paternal in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1.1 (fatherly) [affection/interest/benevolence] paternal; [pride] de padre; [trait/inheritance] paterno
    Example sentences
    • Her status in law compared with an adult son still living in his father's house, under paternal authority.
    • Needless to say, social life is charged with signs that affirm the paternal authority of those in power.
    • Western tradition dictated that that authority should be paternal.
    Example sentences
    • He denies feeling more paternal towards the dancers these days, but owns up to " avuncular".
    • His style with the crews is almost paternal, strong yet fair.
    • There was this strange feeling inside him as he held her, almost paternal, but not quite.
    Example sentences
    • It was the fashion that the first son was named after the paternal grandfather and the second after the father and so on.
    • Iraqi Arabs have very long names, consisting of their first name, their father's name, their paternal grandfather's name, and finally their family name.
    • Seth's father, three uncles, and paternal grandfather, along with a number of cousins and subsequent generations of relatives, were carpenters.
    1.2 (on father's side) (before noun/delante del nombre) por parte de padre paternal grandmother abuela (feminine) paterna, abuela (feminine) por parte de padre paternal aunt tía (feminine) por parte de padre

Definition of paternal in:

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Cultural fact of the day

The language of the Basque Country and Navarre is euskera, spoken by around 750,000 people; in Spanish vasco or vascuence. It is also spelled euskara. Basque is unrelated to the Indo-European languages and its origins are unclear. Like Spain's other regional languages, Basque was banned under Franco. With the return of democracy, it became an official language alongside Spanish, in the regions where it is spoken. It is a compulsory school subject and is required for many official and administrative posts in the Basque Country. There is Basque language television and radio and a considerable number of books are published in Basque. See also lenguas cooficiales