Translation of patronize in Spanish:

patronize

Pronunciation: /ˈpeɪtrənaɪz; ˈpæ-; ˈpætrənaɪz/

vt

  • 1 (condescend to) tratar con condescendencia
    More example sentences
    • Despite the superior and patronizing tone of his voice, there was a deep concern.
    • Removing responsibility from victims is not a kindness; it is patronizing and perpetuates the problem.
    • These last shots betray a sentimentality and patronizing attitude inherent in the film's setting.
  • 2 2.1 (frequent) [formal] [shop/hotel] ser* cliente de; [theater/cinema] frecuentar 2.2 (sponsor) patrocinar, auspiciar
    More example sentences
    • Opposite this building was the Alexandra Tea Room, at 18 Rissik Street, which Gandhi used to patronise and support financially, and where he promoted vegetarianism.
    • Is it really the type of organization you should be patronizing?
    • Members create, finance and patronize the cooperative.
    More example sentences
    • Some customers patronize the store every two or three months; some of the very top spenders come in three to five times a week.
    • In the ad, a father tries to explain to his son why no customers patronize the family restaurant, which mainly sells pork meat-ball soup.
    • People who do not travel into cities to work are much less likely to patronize restaurants, theatres and shops.

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Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.