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patronize

Pronunciation: /ˈpeɪtrənaɪz; ˈpæ-; ˈpætrənaɪz/

Translation of patronize in Spanish:

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1 (condescend to) tratar con condescendencia
    Example sentences
    • Despite the superior and patronizing tone of his voice, there was a deep concern.
    • Removing responsibility from victims is not a kindness; it is patronizing and perpetuates the problem.
    • These last shots betray a sentimentality and patronizing attitude inherent in the film's setting.
  • 2 2.1 (frequent) [formal] [shop/hotel] ser* cliente de; [theater/cinema] frecuentar 2.2 (sponsor) patrocinar, auspiciar
    Example sentences
    • Opposite this building was the Alexandra Tea Room, at 18 Rissik Street, which Gandhi used to patronise and support financially, and where he promoted vegetarianism.
    • Is it really the type of organization you should be patronizing?
    • Members create, finance and patronize the cooperative.
    Example sentences
    • Some customers patronize the store every two or three months; some of the very top spenders come in three to five times a week.
    • In the ad, a father tries to explain to his son why no customers patronize the family restaurant, which mainly sells pork meat-ball soup.
    • People who do not travel into cities to work are much less likely to patronize restaurants, theatres and shops.

Definition of patronize in:

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Cultural fact of the day

The language of the Basque Country and Navarre is euskera, spoken by around 750,000 people; in Spanish vasco or vascuence. It is also spelled euskara. Basque is unrelated to the Indo-European languages and its origins are unclear. Like Spain's other regional languages, Basque was banned under Franco. With the return of democracy, it became an official language alongside Spanish, in the regions where it is spoken. It is a compulsory school subject and is required for many official and administrative posts in the Basque Country. There is Basque language television and radio and a considerable number of books are published in Basque. See also lenguas cooficiales