There are 2 translations of patter in Spanish:

patter1

Pronunciation: /ˈpætər; ˈpætə(r)/

vi

  • [rain] golpetear, tamborilear; [feet/person] golpetear you could hear the mice pattering behind the baseboard se oía corretear a los ratones detrás del zócalo

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.

There are 2 translations of patter in Spanish:

patter2

n

u
  • 1 (sound) golpeteo (m) the soft patter of the rain el suave golpeteo or tamborileo de la lluvia the patter of tiny feet [humorístico/humorous] pasitos (mpl) de niño
  • 2 (talk) the salesman gave me the usual patter el vendedor me soltó el rollo de costumbre she had a very effective sales patter tenía mucha labia para vender, sabía convencer al cliente an insurance agent's patter el discursito típico de un vendedor de seguros

More definitions of patter

Definition of patter in:

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.