Share this entry

Share this page

peculiarity

Pronunciation: /pɪˌkjuːlˈjærəti; pɪˌkjuːliˈærəti/

Translation of peculiarity in Spanish:

noun/nombre (plural -ties)

  • 1.1 countable/numerable (sth unusual) rasgo (masculine) singular; (oddity) rareza (feminine) he has his peculiarities tiene sus rarezas 1.2 uncountable/no numerable (strangeness) lo raro or extraño
    Example sentences
    • There was some peculiarity to the kick, though, as Hartson later intimated that his illustrious partner Henrik Larsson, Celtic's usual penalty taker, had been reluctant to become involved.
    • I just kind of conjured them up out of my subconscious and put them in order of ascending peculiarity.
    • Why does the Supreme Court persist in this peculiarity?
    1.3 countable/numerable (particular, exclusive quality) peculiaridad (feminine), singularidad (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • In the meantime he acquired strange peculiarities of habits.
    • Look carefully at the contorted face in front of you and pick a peculiarity, say an unusual muscle twitch, poor dentition, bad skin, etc.
    • Over the past year, I've learned that inside all subcultures there exists a fascinating world fraught with peculiarities, dangers and strange rituals.
    Example sentences
    • It's likely to be a peculiarity of my own character but I've found it a pretty symbiotic combination, with each side supporting the other.
    • Many of these terms have been created to distinguish locality, others as a direct comment on the character or peculiarities of the Welsh.
    • It's a peculiarity of my nature that I often like to take less than the perfect tool and see what I can do with it.

Definition of peculiarity in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day repecho
m
steep slope …
Cultural fact of the day

The language of the Basque Country and Navarre is euskera, spoken by around 750,000 people; in Spanish vasco or vascuence. It is also spelled euskara. Basque is unrelated to the Indo-European languages and its origins are unclear. Like Spain's other regional languages, Basque was banned under Franco. With the return of democracy, it became an official language alongside Spanish, in the regions where it is spoken. It is a compulsory school subject and is required for many official and administrative posts in the Basque Country. There is Basque language television and radio and a considerable number of books are published in Basque. See also lenguas cooficiales