Translation of pellet in Spanish:

pellet

Pronunciation: /ˈpelət; ˈpelɪt/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 (of bread, paper) bolita (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • Today I noticed that as soon as I dropped a few of the smelly fish food pellets into the water they started to fight over them.
    • Wiley and three co-workers pour 10 metric tons of food pellets into the pens each day and monitor the fish with underwater video cameras to see when they stop eating.
    • To give one example, a red pellet could contain substances such as potassium perchlorate and strontium carbonate, besides pitch as fuel and starch as binder.
    1.2 [Zoology/Zoología] (of regurgitated food) bola (feminine); (feces) cagadita (feminine) [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • Prey is often swallowed whole, and the fur, feathers, and bones are later regurgitated in pellets.
    • Since the mid-1980s, his team has been studying a great skua breeding colony, analyzing bones and feathers in pellets that skuas cough up after feeding.
    • Indigestible materials like fur, feathers and insect exoskeletons, if swallowed, are regurgitated in a pellet.
    More example sentences
    • For the rabbit scent, two to three fecal pellets were placed in the runway within 20 cm on either side of the tile.
    • These specialized fertilizers include compost and processed animal manure pellets.
    • Some tunnels are hollow, with walls consolidated by a mucous secretion; others are packed with fecal pellets, indicating that the animal was eating its way through the sediment.
    1.3 (ammunition) perdigón (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • These can be easily missed or confused with wounds from shot gun pellets or small caliber bullets.
    • The same cannot be said for shotgun pellets, bullets, snares or traps.
    • The police responded by firing rubber bullets, wooden pellets, and tear gas into the crowd.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.