Translation of perverse in Spanish:

perverse

Pronunciation: /pərˈvɜːrs; pəˈvɜːs/

adjective/adjetivo

  • (stubborn) obstinado, terco; (wayward, contrary) retorcido, avieso [literary/literario] she takes a perverse delight in upsetting me siente un placer malsano dándome disgustos
    More example sentences
    • So his decision to show the way last night smacked of a perverse desire to prove something to himself and the world.
    • I always have this perverse but burning desire to be scared, and it's hard for me to achieve this goal simply because it's hard for me to get scared.
    • But I have this perverse desire to be shaved with a cut-throat razor - by an expert.
    More example sentences
    • There is sometimes in us a perverse refusal to accept or to believe in good, a deep-seated, hardened refusal which belittles or despises good.
    • It is perverse because everyone accepts that regular exercise helps reduce the risk of heart attacks, high blood pressure, obesity and even depression.
    • Now, this standard has a certain perverse appeal, at least if we felt it would be universally followed.
    More example sentences
    • In this strategy I am thankfully aided by Floyd, who is doubtless the most perverse sexual deviant ever to reside in our fair city of Wellington.
    • And there's a sort of perverse sexiness, a kinky transgression, about wearing make-up with a bikini, like teaming high heels with a swimsuit.
    • Coming to terms with sexuality is not perverse.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.