There are 2 translations of pipe in Spanish:

pipe1

Pronunciation: /paɪp/

n

More definitions of pipe

Definition of pipe in:

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Word of the day órbita
f
orbit …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.

There are 2 translations of pipe in Spanish:

pipe2

vt

  • 1 (transport by pipe) (+ adv compl) [water/gas/oil] llevar (por tuberías, gasoducto, oleoducto)
  • 2 [Mus] (play) they were piped in to dinner entraron al comedor al son de una gaita the captain was piped aboard tocaron el silbato cuando el capitán subió a bordo
  • 3 3.1 [Culin] [cake] decorar (con manga de repostería) pipe the cream onto the cake decorar el pastel con la crema usando una manga de repostería 3.2 [Clothing] (usu pass) ribetear a red dress piped with white un vestido rojo ribeteado en blanco

Phrasal verbs

pipe down

v + adv
[colloquial/familiar] (usu in imperative) callarse la boca [familiar/colloquial] pipe down! ¡cállate la boca! [familiar/colloquial], ¡cierra el pico! [familiar/colloquial]

pipe up

v + adv
[colloquial/familiar] her friend piped up and said she knew too su amiga saltó con que ella también lo sabía [familiar/colloquial] he always pipes up with some stupid comment siempre sale con alguna tontería

More definitions of pipe

Definition of pipe in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

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Word of the day órbita
f
orbit …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.