There are 2 translations of plaster in Spanish:

plaster1

Pronunciation: /ˈplæstər; ˈplɑːstə(r)/

n

  • 1 u 1.1 [Const] (powder, mixture) yeso (m); (on walls) revoque (m), enlucido (m)
    More example sentences
    • This demolition exposed ‘stripes’ of structure throughout the existing plaster walls and ceilings.
    • If you are nailing over a lath and plaster ceiling, longer nails may be needed.
    • The nature of their decoration, whether by painted plaster on walls or ceilings, or by tessellated and mosaic floors, compares well with that from the countryside.
    More example sentences
    • Mother had inadvertently used plaster of Paris instead of flour.
    • Mix dry plaster of Paris with water until you have a thick, pudding-like consistency.
    • I watch her sifting plaster of Paris through her fingers as she sprinkles it slowly onto limp water.
    1.2plaster (of Paris) [Art] [Med] yeso (m), escayola (f) (Esp) to have one's leg in plaster tener* la pierna enyesada or (Esp tb) escayolada to put sb's arm in plaster enyesarle or (Esp tb) escayolarle el brazo a algn
  • 2 c
    (sticking plaster)
    (BrE) Band-Aid

Definition of plaster in:

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Catalán is the language of Catalonia. Like Castilian, Catalan is a Romance language. Variants of it include mallorquín of the Balearic Islands and valenciano spoken in the autonomous region of Valencia. Banned under Franco, Catalan has enjoyed a revival since Spain's return to democracy and now has around 11 million speakers. It is the medium of instruction in schools and universities and its use is widespread in business, the arts, and the media. Many books are published in Catalan. See also lenguas cooficiales.

There are 2 translations of plaster in Spanish:

plaster2

vt

  • 1 [Const] [wall/room] revocar*, enlucir*; [cracks] rellenar con yeso
    More example sentences
    • My walls and ceiling were plastered and at some point covered with wallpaper.
    • Over time, plaster walls and ceilings may develop stress-cracks.
    • The brick walls were plastered over with lime of which some traces can be seen.
  • 2 2.1 (cover) they plastered the wall with posters cubrieron or empapelaron la pared de afiches she plastered herself with make-up se pintarrajeó toda 2.2 (smear) embadurnar
    More example sentences
    • Sainsburys really got behind Comic Relief, plastering their stores in red noses.
    • Commercial Alert is appealing to journalists not to use the corporate names in sports articles - he says plastering ads in stories blurs the line between editorial and advertising.
    • Both sexes are plastered with band logos on bags, T-shirts, patches - Slipknot, Korn, The Deftones.
  • 3 (defeat) (AmE) [colloquial/familiar], darle* una paliza a [familiar/colloquial] we really plastered them les dimos una buena paliza
    More example sentences
    • It flies from every third building, it is emblazoned on shop displays, plastered on the bumpers of cars, and scrawled on anti-war banners.
    • His company had plastered posters and media stories around the area telling everyone that track repair work would mean no trains that day and advertising replacement buses.
    • You have to wonder why he should want his life story plastered all over the daily papers.
    More example sentences
    • The support-by-fire elements plaster the T-80's area with machine gun fire and main gun rounds.
    • The enemy plastered the troops in this position, particularly from the air, where he was unmolested, and followed the bombardment by a further attack on our position.

Definition of plaster in:

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Word of the day rosca
f
thread …
Cultural fact of the day

Catalán is the language of Catalonia. Like Castilian, Catalan is a Romance language. Variants of it include mallorquín of the Balearic Islands and valenciano spoken in the autonomous region of Valencia. Banned under Franco, Catalan has enjoyed a revival since Spain's return to democracy and now has around 11 million speakers. It is the medium of instruction in schools and universities and its use is widespread in business, the arts, and the media. Many books are published in Catalan. See also lenguas cooficiales.